Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Do It Yourself Links & Resources > General Information

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-16-2006, 12:07 PM
vstech's Avatar
DD MOD, HVAC,MCP,Mac,GMAC
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Mount Holly, NC
Posts: 26,287
Heated garage floors DIY... great data.

Hi, I love working on my MB's, and I just realized most of you out there don't have heat in your garages, or (GASP) are working outside...
anyway, if you are a little handy, and you have a water heater nearby, I can design up some simple plans to get you some portable, comfortable radiant heat. post replies here, and if it looks like something you guys are interested in, I will take pictures and work up a DIY to use.
basically it is a small flat section of cement or even plastic with small tubing in it and you just pump hot water thruough it. great for working under a car.
John
__________________
John HAUL AWAY, OR CRUSHED CARS!!! HELP ME keep the cars out of the crusher! A/C Thread
"as I ride with my a/c on... I have fond memories of sweaty oily saturdays and spewing R12 into the air. THANKS for all you do!

My drivers:
1987 190D 2.5Turbo
1987 190D 2.5Turbo
1987 190D 2.5-5SPEED!!!

1987 300TD
1987 300TD
1994GMC 2500 6.5Turbo truck... I had to put the ladder somewhere!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-16-2006, 12:11 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: st paul, mn
Posts: 284
You can make it even simpler by using a sheet of cement board, electric radiant heat wires (like for a bathroom floor), and some big tiles (or another sheet of cement board). With either system you will probably want to insulate underneath it with styrofoam or the garage floor will act like a big ol heat sink.
__________________
andy t
'78 300d
'95 volvo 850, wagon
'86 300sdl - engine out, maybe I'll have it rolling by June

whole bunch o' bicycles
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-16-2006, 02:01 PM
whunter's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
Posts: 17,354
Please

Write it up.

I would like to have this thread in General Information, so it does not get lost.




Have a great day.

Last edited by whunter; 09-18-2012 at 02:37 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-16-2006, 02:48 PM
bgkast's Avatar
Rollin' on 16s
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Vancouver WA
Posts: 6,528
I just wish I had a garage.
__________________
1979 240D- 316K miles - VGT Turbo, Intercooler, Stick Shift, Many Other Mods - Daily Driver

1982 300SD - 232K miles - Wife's Daily Driver

1986 560SL - Wife's red speed machine
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-16-2006, 03:26 PM
winmutt's Avatar
85 300D 4spd+tow+h4
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Atl Gawga
Posts: 9,329
Just get a crawler, electric socks, and a heater with sealed elements.
__________________
http://superturbodiesel.com/images/sig.04.10.jpg
1987 300D Sturmmachine
1991 300D Nearly Perfect
1994 E320 Cabriolet
1995 E320 Touring
2001 Eurovan FOR SALE
1985 300D car, sold and missed.
OBK #42
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-16-2006, 06:32 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: st paul, mn
Posts: 284
Cement backer board comes in 3' x 5' sheets.
For the simplest kit you will need:
2 sheets of backer board (cement, not re-inforced gypsum)- 1/2" thick.
Thinset mortar (comes either premixed or dry mix-your-own)
Wire for radiant floor heat (comes either by the foot or in a kit embedded in silicone mesh material)
A lighting dimmer switch and a plug.


First: this is electric. The radiant wiring is well sealed, but not made for a wet environment. Use common sense
Basically you are going to use the thinset mortar to sandwich the wiring between the two sheets of cement. Follow the directions that come with the radiant wiring. Run a power wire out, put the dimmer switch in line to control the temp, and plug it into the wall.
I would lay this apparatus on a 1" piece of styrofoam insulation and hammer together a simple wooden frame to keep the edges from getting chewed up.

For a more swank look, you can use 12" or bigger ceramic floor tiles on top instead of the sheet of backer board.
This apparatus will be heavy but you should be able to slide it around with a helper.

If you want to make it safe for a wet environment you will want to use hot water for heat and make it with PEX tubing instead. This application will be more permanent. IF you can live with a high spot on your floor do this:
You'll need:
1/2 " Pex tubing O2 impervious
1/2" clips to hold the pex in place
pex connectors
1/2 copper pipe and fittings (maybe not needed, depends on how you plumb it)
Bleeder valve
2 gallon, 1500 watt water heater
small boiler pump
All this should be in the plumbing section of your home center
You'll also need :
cement
styrofoam



build a wooden frame 3" high, big as you want. Keep in mind that PEX tubing only bends down to a 6" (I think) radius. You are going to put styrofoam on the bottom again and then lay in a length of PEX. Zig zag it back and forth with about 8" spacing. Tack it in place with the 1/2" clips. Leave a healthy amount coming out the side of your frame. Fill with concrete. You want at least 1" on top of the tubing.

For the boiler you are going to use your 2 gallon heater. Plumb the pump onto it (it works well to put the pump on top of the heater. Plumb the bleeder valve into the high point of the system, after the pump. Your pex will form a circuit and should include 2 "T"s with garden hose fittings (the ones with an on/off valve). The Ts will be for filling with water. Wire the pump to an on/off switch and just run it all the time when your system is on. Fill with anti freeze if you will not be running constantly.

For a much sleeker system, get a diamond blade for your Skilsaw and cut a rectangle in the garage floor then put this whole thing in level with the floor.

There is a lot of information online about in-floor radiant heat. There may be a DVD at the home center that will give you the basics, there was at Menards when I put my system together for my kitchen. Everything will be in the plumbing section, but it may not be labeled as stuff for radiant heating. You should be able to build a water heated system for about $500, an electric one should be as little as $200.

I don't claim to be an expert, please pile on and add insight anything that I might have missed.
__________________
andy t
'78 300d
'95 volvo 850, wagon
'86 300sdl - engine out, maybe I'll have it rolling by June

whole bunch o' bicycles
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-16-2006, 06:33 PM
Hatterasguy's Avatar
Zero
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Milford, CT
Posts: 19,306
I simply don't work under my car in the winter unless I have to. All work that needs me on the ground is done in April once the garage slab warms up enough.
__________________
2017 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ
2007 Tiara 3200

"No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms. The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government."
-Thomas Jefferson
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-16-2006, 06:49 PM
92497pmu's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Clifton Park, NY
Posts: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgkast View Post
I just wish I had a garage.
ditto
__________________
Phil
Previously loved
variety, but I miss the 99 F350 PSD- 37k, traded, damn

Current stable
98 E-300 TurboDiesel, 253k
http://www.facebook.com/people/Philip-Underwood/762882374
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-16-2006, 07:46 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: MA
Posts: 482
hehe I work in the snow on my back.. on long jobs you pack down this nice ice slick with your body heat acting like a zamboni and it makes it really easy to slide underneath hands get *REALLY* cold though, but after a half hour you can't feel 'em anyway so it doesnt matter, just makes finger-tightening bolts impossible. If I had the time and money I'd do something to remedy this situation but putting on lots of clothes is a freebie option... nice idea with the radiant heat.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-16-2006, 09:21 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Wakefield, RI
Posts: 2,145
I have a "blue flame" type 28,000btu propane heater in my basement shop that opens into the garage. I also use a "mr heater" unit on top of a gas grille type propane bottle to heat the garage when I need it. I run the mr heater for an hour or so before I start working and the garage will be 50*F+ by then in the dead of winter. Insulated Carhartt bibs and a sweatshirt its pretty comfortable. Blue flame heater and Mr Heater from Northern Tool for @$200 total. Got the big outdoors propane bottles and regulator that feed the blue flame from a buddy for free. RT
__________________
When all else fails, vote from the rooftops!
84' Mercedes Benz 300D Anthracite/black, 171K
03' Volkswagen Jetta TDI blue/black, 93K
93' Chevrolet C2500HD ExCab 6.5TD, Two-tone blue, 252K
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-16-2006, 09:59 PM
t walgamuth's Avatar
dieselarchitect
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Lafayette Indiana
Posts: 34,156
when i put in the slab in my lower basement garage i installed tubes so i could circulate hot water. i also insulated under the slab. but so far i have not hooked it all up.

tom w
__________________
[SIGPIC] Diesel loving autocrossing grandpa Architect. 08 Dodge 3/4 ton with Cummins & six speed; I have had about 35 benzes. I have a 39 Studebaker Coupe Express pickup in which I have had installed a 617 turbo and a five speed manual.[SIGPIC]

..I also have a 427 Cobra replica with an aluminum chassis.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-16-2006, 11:25 PM
dieselmania's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Tucson, Arizona, USA
Posts: 566
If any of you are considering the electric mat heater there is one very important part that wasn't mentioned...you MUST power it from a GFCI supplied source. Laying on the ground trapped between your car and an electrical grid could be fatal if a leak developed. The manufacturers of heat mats all require GFCI protection in their installation instructions.

Brian.........Licensed electrician in AZ
__________________
Brian
87 300Dturbo 180K #14 head still running R-12 SOLD 12/2017
02 F350 Powerstroke 170K
05 Chevy Express 1 ton w/Royal Utility box 110K
08 Infiniti FX-35 39K
15 Golf Sportwagen TDI 28K
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-16-2006, 11:43 PM
mobetta's Avatar
(Oo{-I-}oO)
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: minnesota,hey.
Posts: 1,840
get a bunch of card board. enough for about an inch thick pad as big as you need. that will keep you alot warmer than concrete, or snow. FREE.
__________________
1984 123.193 372,xxx miles, room for Seven.

1999 Dodge Durango Cummins 4BTAA 47RE 5k lb 4x4 getting 25+mpgs, room for Seven.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-17-2006, 02:10 AM
Diesel Dan's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 264
Ditto on the cardboard. I've been using that for years, regardless of the weather. Even just a single sheet makes it easy to slide around, and keeps you relatively clean and comfortable - especially if you are working in the driveway as opposed to a garage, which has been the case for me these past several years. My garage has, unfortunately, become a storage facility.
__________________
1987 Mercedes 300D ~200K (Greasecar & Biodiesel)
1993 Ford F-250 7.3 IDI diesel 165K (Biodiesel)
1996 Thomas/International Bus with DT466 engine
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-17-2006, 08:51 AM
t walgamuth's Avatar
dieselarchitect
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Lafayette Indiana
Posts: 34,156
yes. cardboard is very luxurious. i also have a 1/2" thick foam mat that we bought for our motorcycle trip through canada in 76. it is like cardoard but a little more luxurious. it doesnt slide as well though.

tom w
__________________
[SIGPIC] Diesel loving autocrossing grandpa Architect. 08 Dodge 3/4 ton with Cummins & six speed; I have had about 35 benzes. I have a 39 Studebaker Coupe Express pickup in which I have had installed a 617 turbo and a five speed manual.[SIGPIC]

..I also have a 427 Cobra replica with an aluminum chassis.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page