Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes ShopForum > Technical Information and Support > Tech Help

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-26-2003, 12:10 AM
fhmajid
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Rear wheel camber way out of cross-tolerance

Hi,
The rear wheel camber on the driver side is twice that on the passenger side. The car is a 1995 E320 wagon and has never been hit. The passenger side camber is just over 1.2 degrees, whereas the driver side is at least 2.4.
I should add that I have E500 springs in the vehicle. Lowering it should not create a situation where cross-tolerance is exceeded so badly. And this is considering that I already used a shim on the driver side above the spring pad. God knows what the camber would have been without the shim.
Any ideas what might be causing the excessive camber situation?
Thanks
farrukh
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-26-2003, 12:35 AM
Glen's Avatar
...auto enthusiast
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Carlsbad, CA USA
Posts: 1,186
Well...assuming ride height is the same left to right, I'd say either the camber strut is bent or it's bushings are completely shot.

While we're on the subject...how much did the E500 springs lower the wagon? Is the ride firmer?
__________________
Glen Tokuhara
Beauty & the Beast and the wagon that could!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-27-2003, 09:12 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 1,006
Sounds like you are making the self-levelling system unhappy. May have been the same without the shim.
__________________
Brian Toscano
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-27-2003, 01:57 PM
fhmajid
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Glen,
The E500 springs work well for the most part. While the fronts can be mated with 500 shocks, the rears have to be used with the original shocks. This makes the damping a little more abrupt than I would like. The car is also highly sensitive to tyre choice. If you have less than perfect roads, as we do in Philly, you'd be well advised to throw on some Pilot HX MXM4s in H rating (used 215/55-16). When I tried Pilot Primacys in the same size, handling and braking improved visibily over the HXs, but the ride depreciated substantially.
The car is no BMW sport wagon, however, handles pretty darn well while being baby comfortable.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-27-2003, 01:59 PM
fhmajid
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
MD,
Please elaborate on your comment of making the self-leveling system unhappy.
Usually, the manifestiation of this is whistling,knocking etc. Overlowering should not create cross-tolerance exceeding cambeer conditions.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-27-2003, 03:01 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 1,006
Measure ride height from center of wheel star to the underside of the fender lip. What is this measurement? Is it the same side to side? If it is, you probably have something broken, bent, loose, or worn. When lowering the vehicle you are changing the suspension geometry and possibly changing the way the self levelling system adjusts the level. IF the system, for example, is using extra capacity to level the right side, it may not be working correctly on the left side. I do not know for certain, but mentioned it as a possible/probable cause.
__________________
Brian Toscano
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2011 Pelican Parts - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page