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  #1  
Old 05-01-2003, 07:30 AM
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Do you have to use a pressure bleeder with ABS Brakes?

Do you have to use a pressure bleeder with ABS Brakes?
Can you hand bleed them instead?

If you have to use a pressure bleeder, where can you buy one and are they expensive?
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  #2  
Old 05-01-2003, 08:28 AM
LarryBible
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Carrameow,

Are you really talking about BLEEDING as with air in the system, or do you simply need to flush?

I have successfully bled AND flushed with conventional methods just as with any car, but bleeding air out is probably best done with a good pressure bleeder.

Flushing can be done in any way as long as you don't introduce air into the system.

Good luck,
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  #3  
Old 05-01-2003, 10:07 AM
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The W124 factory manual specifies 30 psi is required to properly BLEED the ABS unit.

Using visegrips to stop of the flow of brake fluid is not recommended on this site. (edited)
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Last edited by md21722; 05-01-2003 at 03:04 PM.
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  #4  
Old 05-01-2003, 11:16 AM
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I would point out the brake pedal is a system for building pressure inside the brake hydraulics, and as such makes an excellent bleeding device. It can easily develop 30PSI...

- JimY
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  #5  
Old 05-01-2003, 11:21 AM
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I just curious as to how you stopped the fluid flow when you replaced the line that you ruined by clamping with visegrips?
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  #6  
Old 05-01-2003, 11:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by stevebfl
I just curious as to how you stopped the fluid flow when you replaced the line that you ruined by clamping with visegrips?
Darn steve, you said it before I could.
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  #7  
Old 05-01-2003, 01:03 PM
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So what is the answer?

Can I use the old fashioned method where you hook a clear hose to the bleed valve and stick the other end in a bottle of brake fluid? My plan would be to do this on the pump, the reservoir and the four calipers, in succession...

Boy I have enuff tools already. I dont need anymore..
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  #8  
Old 05-01-2003, 02:06 PM
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I've always used the old-fashioned manual method to change brake fluid on my 190E with ABS. I start by siphoning out as much of the old fluid as possible, but you can only reach one reservoir (forgot which) due to the internal baffling that separates the two reservoirs. Then I bleed as much as possible out of the other before adding fresh fluid.

As always be careful not to let a reservoir run dry as it will take lots of bleeding to get all the air out (Yes, it's happened to me.) I usually bleed through a full quart of DOT 4 fluid, and this should ensure a good flush if you start out with the M/C level at minimum before you add fresh fluid.

It takes longer than pressure bleeding and you have to Shanghai someone to pump the pedal, but I only do it every couple of years.

Duke
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  #9  
Old 05-01-2003, 02:34 PM
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On plain Bosch ABS no ASR, there is no need for special bleeding procedures.
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  #10  
Old 05-01-2003, 02:35 PM
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Thanks for clarifying that vice grips aren't good for brake lines. Can you estimate what the rate of failure is if vice grips are used on brake lines? (edited)
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Last edited by md21722; 05-01-2003 at 03:05 PM.
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  #11  
Old 05-01-2003, 02:59 PM
LarryBible
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Steve,

LOL, I really enjoyed your response regarding the vise grips.

As always the offering of your professional time and comment on this site is GREATLY appreciated.

Have a great day,
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  #12  
Old 05-01-2003, 03:06 PM
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back to bleeding/flushing ...

On a w210 and a w203 (with ASR/ESP) can you flush the system with a pressure bleeder? Or would this leave "stale" brake fluid within the (expensive) control valves that you are trying to protect?

I'd like to think I can flush my own brake fluid (once out of the 4 yr mb maint agreement), but I suspect it is necessary to activate these valves while flushing in order to get ALL the fluid changed.

Thanks ...
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  #13  
Old 05-01-2003, 04:03 PM
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The problem comes when bleeding brakes when a problem comes.

Almost all systems can be bled with standard procedures. The systems with accumulators will not be bled in this way but can be manually operated by backprobing.

We recently had a ASR version A6 Audi with a sticking caliper at a rear wheel. When bleeding we could get almost nothing from that circuit. We went to the hydraulic actuator and grounded the apropriate pins that the controller would to activate the valves. Each one of the valves made a distinct clunk when activated except the one we were interested in. An ammeter showed that the current was the same. This indicated to us that the oiston was jammed. Probably in the hold state. In new actuator fixed the car.

Getting all the old fluid out of the accumulator would probably require such techniques or a scan tool.
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  #14  
Old 05-01-2003, 04:54 PM
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After screwing up my first brake fluid flush (let the rear brake reservoir compartment run dry) I bought some speedbleeders and they make the job a snap. Easy one man operation now.
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  #15  
Old 05-02-2003, 12:16 AM
Coming back from burnout
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
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not all techs are like SteveBfl

I am definitely not a PRO but I will still rebuild one or two engines before my career is over. I love working on cars, its therapy and a stress reliever in the 21st century. I can drive somethin I built with my hands..

BTW Mechanics are no different than the spectrum of human nature, scientists, housewives and hotdog vendors,and we humans are not saints nor are we entirely evil.

In fact, most mechanics are very very decent and honorable, its the shop managers I dont trust and am wary of...

Anyway as a true amateur I would rather use vice grips on my brake lines than take my car to these shops..at least it meant I tried...
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