Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Mercedes-Benz Tech Information and Support > Tech Help

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-08-2004, 10:33 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Flower Mound, Texas
Posts: 140
Replacing brake rotors and pads on a 95 E320 W124 - first time DIY observations

Brakes:
Very intuitive. My layman’s version: Break the lug bolts loose, jack the car up and remove the wheel. First thing I did was pulled the two, small plastic brake pad level sensor connector out – not from where they ‘mount’ to the pad, or are inserted in the pad, but to where they connect to the caliper (and thus, are wired into the car’s electrical harness). Gently wiggle back and forth- they will come out. I then opened the master cylinder – be sure you don’t have a full master cylinder reservoir, or fluid will spill out when you compress the caliper pistons. Keep an eye on this. Next thing I did, with the master cylinder cap open, is put a screwdriver between the brake pad and caliper – and pried against the brake pad – on all four corners, pushing the four caliper pistons flush. You’ll need them as flush as possible to fit the new pads against the new rotors. Clearance will be tight, but will fit. Remove the pad mounting pins (two per wheel) with a narrow, long punch and hammer – the pads will drop out of the bottom of the caliper. I also, I think before the above steps, loosened the two caliper-to-spindle bolts. There are four large bolts here, you only have to remove the two that hold the caliper in place. It’s intuitive – so look, and you’ll see. Very straightforward here. My only warning is to use a 3/8” ratchet and SHORT six point socket and extension on the top bolt head, as the ½” combinatation, or 3/8” deepwell combination, will not allow you to get a straight-on bite to the bolt. Or – use a sturdy, tight fitting wrench. I definitely recommend a breaker bar as well. You’ll need it. Just be careful here, that you don’t round off the corners of this top bolt. I almost did. When removed, I simply propped my caliper up on the outer tie rod end linkage where it was out of the way – and be careful – and don’t let it drop. Only held in place by fragile fluid lines. The rotor came off very easily, with a 5mm hex wrench/socket (remove the bolt). I cleaned the mating surface (hub) with a drill/wire brush and put antisieze on the hub before installing the new rotor. After the new rotor was in place, I used loctite on the caliper mounting bolts and bolted it back on (81-5 ft lbs torque, I believe). It also helps to have your key in the ignition so you can turn your wheels (at the wheelwell) where you want during this process. Also, it’s a good time to pry off your wheel bearing cap (outside of the hub). Mine was packed full of fresh MB green wheel bearing grease- which is a good sign in my book. This design is very ford-like, so I had to problem getting the cap on/off. Just a large, flathead screwdriver to pry all around the cap until off. And the hammer to gently tap back in place. Next, I spent a lot of time on the pad preparation. Which included removing the original sensors from the pads – they are PLASTIC and press in. I ended up using a small amount of WD-40 on the area, to help the sensor slide out. I used a ‘pick’, like a finely pointed dental instrument, to slowly eeek the sensor out of it’s hole in the old brake pad. And finally, as it was near the top, wiggled out with pliers. Installation is very straightforward. Same way out, same way in. Just go slow and be careful. They are cheap to order, it’s just something you may want to do on your next order if you will be taking on this job. Order a couple of spares. Next – my only dilemma was what to use from brake pad paste (anti-squeal). The original coating looked kinda yellow/green, but was definitely dirty. So I wiped dry the little steel plate that presses next to the backside of the brake pad, and put it aside. I then coated the backside of my new brake pads with an antisieze I got from oreilley’s (like autozone – in texas). Two small tubes of red material. Basically, put it on very liberally on the back of the new brake pads AND on the side of the steel plate (that pushes against the brake pad) that the caliper pistions press. In other words: Back of pad (anti-seize) < steel backing plate < other side of steel backing plate (anti-seize) < caliper piston. Hope that made sense. All metal-to-metal areas had anitisieze on it. Oh yeah, my dilemma….I would’ve liked to use the Mercedes benz paste, but didn’t want to make the trip to the dealer. Next time, I’ll plan ahead better. (so it was a short dilemma…we’ll see if the brakes are squeaking next month!) One last thing – I let the pieces with anti-seize sit in the sun for awhile – so it would dry faster and cure. Didn’t want to install wet, as I didn’t want the paste to be ‘pushed away’ during assembly/brake use. Also, you might find you’ll need to push your caliper pistons back in place, with your new rotor on. Just use the old pads – and use a screwdriver between the old pad/pistion, and compress them. Being an old ford/Volvo guy, I had my “C” clamp out – in preparation to compress the pistons. NEVER needed it. Reassembly was straightforward. I used a few drops of oil on the wheel bolts – and loctite on the rotor-to hub bolt (5mm). I think that’s it. And this is the way I did it – a first time MB DIYer. Very simple. Brakes work great – no squeal. And total cost was around $150.

Thanks to all who advised me on this. Please feel free to comment/correct me where necessary. I hope this helps someone in a similar situation. Best regards, 71Rcode
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-08-2004, 11:09 PM
Glen's Avatar
...auto enthusiast
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Carlsbad, CA USA
Posts: 1,187
The only thing I'd add is to put a very thin film of anti-squeal on the edges of the pad backing that slide in the caliper.
__________________
Glen Tokuhara
Beauty & the Beast and the wagon that could!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-09-2004, 08:54 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Evansville, Indiana
Posts: 8,150
I use standard anti-sieze compound on the brake pads. Never had squeal.

It doesn't dry....

Peter
__________________
1972 220D ?? miles
1988 300E 200,012
1987 300D Turbo killed 9/25/07, 275,000 miles
1985 Volvo 740 GLE Turobodiesel 218,000
1972 280 SE 4.5 165, 000 - It runs!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-09-2004, 09:49 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: longview, texas
Posts: 41
nice write up; just the way i will do it when its my turn on my 2000 ml 430; hey, has anybody tried ceramic pads? they worked great on my camry; very quiet, and minimal dusting.
__________________
dan
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-09-2004, 07:25 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Evansville, Indiana
Posts: 8,150
Don't know about ceramic pads, but aftermarket pads in general on MB tend to scream. Be prepared.

Peter
__________________
1972 220D ?? miles
1988 300E 200,012
1987 300D Turbo killed 9/25/07, 275,000 miles
1985 Volvo 740 GLE Turobodiesel 218,000
1972 280 SE 4.5 165, 000 - It runs!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-09-2004, 07:44 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,160
The only item I would add to all of this, is the importance of break-in of your new pads & rotors.
Bedding-in of pads is considered crucial.
Have heard of some people attaching a stick-it note to the steering wheel, as a reminder to follow break-in guidelines.
__________________
2007 C 230 Sport.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-09-2004, 07:57 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Evansville, Indiana
Posts: 8,150
I've been told to rough up the rotors with some coarse sandpaper on the W124, too. I did, and I have perfect brakes now! I always drive like I'm breaking in the pads anyway, so that wasn't a problem.

Peter
__________________
1972 220D ?? miles
1988 300E 200,012
1987 300D Turbo killed 9/25/07, 275,000 miles
1985 Volvo 740 GLE Turobodiesel 218,000
1972 280 SE 4.5 165, 000 - It runs!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-09-2004, 09:36 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Flower Mound, Texas
Posts: 140
Hey guys - thanks!

What is the break in procedure? Hard stops at freeway speeds? I didn't do this - I know. My wife's been driving the car, and she babies it.

Will the pads just glaze over if I don't romp down on the brakes a few times...without breaking them in? Thanks much.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-09-2004, 11:06 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,160
Basically, it goes something like this:
Use the brakes " firmly " ( to prevent glazing ).
No panicstops ( if you can avoid it ).
Allow brakes to cool between stops.
These rules apply to the first 100-200 miles driving with new rotors/pads.
Once in a while when I'm out cruising, with no traffic around, I like to make 2-3 very hard stops, just to minimize any glazing effect my wifes driving may be causing.


__________________
2007 C 230 Sport.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-10-2004, 12:02 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Evansville, Indiana
Posts: 8,150
Gentle stops only until the fur is worn off the pads, and they are beginning to wear in to the rotor surface. These rotors appear to have distinct tool marks, so the pads will only touch about 50% of the surface to start with.

Several firm stops from about 40 mph in rapid succession will seat the pads, but the real key is very gentle use until the full surface is contacting the rotor to prevent local overheating.

Easy to tell when they are broken in correctly, and the braking effect is effortless and powerfull, unlike when you first put them in and they feel mushy.

Peter
__________________
1972 220D ?? miles
1988 300E 200,012
1987 300D Turbo killed 9/25/07, 275,000 miles
1985 Volvo 740 GLE Turobodiesel 218,000
1972 280 SE 4.5 165, 000 - It runs!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-10-2004, 01:57 AM
wbain5280's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Northern Va.
Posts: 3,386
I use PBR (Repco) pads exclusively and I have never had a problem with them. Low dust and no noise.
__________________
Regards

Warren

Currently 1965 220Sb, 2002 FORD Crown Vic Police Interceptor

Had 1965 220SEb, 1967 230S, 280SE 4.5, 300SE (W126), 420SEL

ENTER > = (HP RPN)

Not part of the in-crowd since 1952.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-10-2004, 01:00 PM
Rick Miley's Avatar
Spark Free
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: Land O Lakes, FL
Posts: 3,086
I second Warren's info. Zimmerman rotors and PBR deluxe pads from Fastlane on my E300 this week. They're fantastic.
__________________
Rick Miley
2014 Tesla Model S
2018 Tesla Model 3
2017 Nissan LEAF
Former MB: 99 E300, 86 190E 2.3, 87 300E, 80 240D, 82 204D Euro
Chain Elongation References
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page