Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Mercedes-Benz Tech Information and Support > Tech Help

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-20-2004, 02:26 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 445
buying brake cleaner in bulk

This probably belongs in the open forum but I get the impression that this post would get lost among the mostly non-tech, non-car open discussion posts.

I'm starting to work on cars often to supplement my income. The amount and the cost of the aerosal brake cleaner cans I go through is bothering me. I never seem to stock enough so I'm always running out. I guess if i could buy it by the case for cheap i'd belly up.

I use it on many auto repair jobs, often before the part is off of the car. Just this past week i used about 4 cans to spray off the grime on a oil pan (BMW gasket replacement job), 2 drive axles (Infiniti replacement) and brakes assembly (MB caliper rebuilds). At a cost of at least $2 per 14oz can I was wondering if it would be more economical and not much more of a hassle to fill my A/C flush gun with a comprable chemical to get the job done more economically? A parts cleaner tub wont solve the problem since the dirty part is often still attached to the vehicle.

On a seperate note I am doing most of the reapir work on a concrete area that also doubles as my little boys play area. When it's clear of cars, tools, parts and chemicals of course. The concrete is starting to stain in the area where some greae, oil etc inevitably misses the pan. I've tried muratic acid and TSP to clean up. the stains remain and I wonder if it would be a good idea to treat the concreate with something (non slip prefered) to facilitate clean up and prevent the area from degrading into a greasy stained spot. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Elliot
__________________
1972 450SL
1982 300D Turbo
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-20-2004, 06:46 AM
engatwork's Avatar
busy
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Soperton, Ga. USA
Posts: 12,376
You can purchase brake cleaner in bulk and I have seen a spray system that you pour the cleaner in and then you can spray it like from the cans. I will look around on my favorites and see if I can find the link to the site that sells these spray can systems.
__________________
Jim
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-20-2004, 07:11 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Fairfax, VA
Posts: 520
I believe that brake cleaner is dry cleaning fluid - trichlorethylene. This stuff is absorbed through your skin and damages your liver. Always wear rubber gloves. Ventilation is important.

Your health and safety is important to your family, so I hope someone more knowlegeable than me can add to this.

regards,
Mark
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-20-2004, 02:22 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 445
Is there something safer that i can use. It's hard to completely avoid getting on me and breathing it when i use it. I am concerned.
__________________
1972 450SL
1982 300D Turbo
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-21-2004, 12:31 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 1,478
You could try wearing goggles + gloves + full sleeve clothing while spraying. Possibly a respirator rated for that type of solvent if you are spending lots of time around it. Be aware of the type of gloves necessary to handle the solvet. I believe latex gloves do not protect against xylene-based brake cleaners..!

For general degreasing, you could try substituting a water-based cleaner, like Simple Green or one of those citric acid based degreasers. Most are non-toxic, although the citric acid ones can be flammable.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-21-2004, 02:57 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: oregon
Posts: 2,013
for a while I was doing some car repair work for friends. In the state of Oregon you can get in a real jam doing brake work unless you are certified
and a problem happens. there was one other catogory I think front end work that also needed certification other than that you were free to work on cars for money as I understood it. of course most ligit shops have insurance in case they mess up but most shade tree wrench turners around here don't worry about such things.help a friend and make a few bucks........

William Rogers........
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-21-2004, 12:08 PM
csnow's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Mass
Posts: 1,127
Quote:
Originally posted by erubin
Is there something safer that i can use. It's hard to completely avoid getting on me and breathing it when i use it. I am concerned.
One solution would be to move to another state. My brake cleaner says right on the label that it only causes cancer in California.

Seriously, though. Disposable Nitrile gloves, long sleeves, lots of ventilation, and a proper respirator if you can't avoid the bulk of the fumes.

This place sells gallon containers and giant pressurized containers. 4 gallons is $64.

http://www.aervoe.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=A&Product_Code=G592
__________________
1986 300E 5-Speed 240k mi.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-21-2004, 01:57 PM
MrCjames's Avatar
California Dreaming
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 599
Soylent Green, I mean Simple green
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-21-2004, 06:59 PM
Pete Geither's Avatar
Half Fast Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Western Pa.
Posts: 2,417
I hate aerosol brake cleaners and discourage their use in our shop strictly for the negative effects I have heard about their ingredients. If you are using a lot of them I suggest you find some safe substitute. We don't do that much brake work so we can survive without them.
__________________
95 SL500 Smoke Silver, Parchment 64K
07 E350 4matic Station Wagon White 34K
02 E320 4Matic Silver/grey 80K
05 F150 Silver 44K
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-21-2004, 09:07 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,141
I'm not sure what the current mix is...


A very good cleaner as mentioned is benzene(C6H6) I believe. Not to be confused with the old word for gasoline-benzine.

Anyway, for nice cleaning of things I've used Naptha which can be purchased in bulk by the gallon from petrolum distributor or you can buy a gallon at Lowes for $7. Think of it as closer to laquer thinner so it is flameable.

No offense, but 4 cans to clean a oil pan? You should have a parts cleaner. For brake jobs, I've been washing down the calipers, wheel wells with citric acid cleaner before working. Things are damp, but my hands remain clean. No dust, so I worry less about health effects. I've also just used the pressure washer cleaner from Autozone and a pressure washer.



Michael
__________________
Michael McGuire
83 300d
01 vw A4 TDI
66 Chevy Corsa
68 GMC V6 w/oD
86 300E
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-02-2004, 03:31 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 445
Thank you for all your comments. Here is an article i thought might be of interest:

What to recommend for cleaning brake parts:
Brake cleaner is a chemical product specifically formulated to do a specific job. There are other chemicals that can be used for cleaning, but many leave behind a residue that can contaminate linings and attack rubber components.

Brake cleaners contain a variety of ingredients. Many have been reformulated to make them more environmentally friendly.

For years, 1-1-1 trichloroethane was the primary ingredient in most aerosol brake cleaners. It works great, dries almost instantly, leaves no residue and is nonflammable.

It was also a relatively inexpensive chemical until a new federal excise tax increased its cost. The tax was applied because 1-1-1 trichloroethane is an ozone-depleting chemical (like CFCs).

To minimize the impact of the new tax, some cleaners now use a mixture of 1-1-1 trichloroethane with other chemicals such as perchloroethylene. Others have eliminated 1-1-1 trichloroethane altogether and use other chemicals.

Perchloroethylene is a chemical used by dry cleaners because of its excellent cleaning properties. It dries fast (though not quite as fast as 1- 1-1 trichloroethane), leaves no residue, and is nonflammable. It also costs less than 1-1-1 trichloroethane.

Perchloroethylene is a Volatile Organic Compound (VOC), which is being regulated because it contributes to air pollution. It is also toxic and not biodegradeable.

Some cleaners use nonchlorinated formulas, including n-methyl pyrollidone, oxodecyl acetate (acetone), methanol alcohol, toluene, and various petroleum distillates. None of these chemicals are CFCs and are exempt from federal CFC taxes.

Most nonchlorinated brake cleaners don't clean as well as 1-1-1 trichloroethane or perchloroethylene, nor do they dry as fast. Products without petroleum distillates do not leave a residue.

Nonchlorinated brake cleaners are flammable, making them subject to a national fire code regulation limiting the number of cans of flammable product a retail store or parts jobber can stock. Nonchlorinated brake cleaners are also VOCs and not biodegradeable. Some are toxic.

Another alternative are water-based brake cleaners. These typically contain a citrus-based solvent, such as D-Limonene, and other ingredients, such as Methyl Ethyl Ketone. The primary advantages with a water-based formula are nonflammability, no residue, biodegradability of the base product, low VOCs, no ozone depletion or greenhouse gases, and low toxicity. Water-based products clean more slowly and may require scrubbing or wiping to do a thorough job. Drying times are also slow, measured in hours rather than minutes or seconds.
__________________
1972 450SL
1982 300D Turbo
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-25-2006, 11:35 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 445
autozone sells brake cleaner under their valucraft house brand for $1.09/can./ Cheapest around. I actually negiotiate it down to 99 cents a can when i buy it by the case. just tell them that the 99 cent store is selling it and they'll price match.
__________________
1972 450SL
1982 300D Turbo
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-26-2006, 12:29 AM
Moneypit SEL's Avatar
Now what?
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: SE PA
Posts: 525
I'd forget the cans and use a pressure washer.
__________________
1989 300 SEL that mostly works, but needs TLC
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-26-2006, 04:37 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 445
i do a lot of side jobs so i go through a lot of repair work. sometimes the convenience and the effectiveness of brake cleaner is hard to beat. like for locating the source of a trans or engine leak by cleaning the area off first. Or to blast off the crude from attached brake parts after wire brushing them. On the other hand i use soapy water sponge on new brake discs to remove the factory applied anti corrosion oil since, it's effective, cheaper and less vapors to breath. I live in a relatively coastal area so runoff into the the ocean concerns me. All my chemical spraying runoff is captured and periodically carried to a recyling location, that includes coolant too , which I store seperately for recycle/disposal.

You mentioned a pressure washer, would that be a water one? If so my problem with that is the amount of polluted runoff I'd generate and the wet messy surface and surroundings that remain with water. If you mean pressurizing your own brake cleaner type chemical I'd like to learn more. But at $1/can it's hard to beat the convenience
__________________
1972 450SL
1982 300D Turbo
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-26-2006, 02:08 PM
Moneypit SEL's Avatar
Now what?
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: SE PA
Posts: 525
Quote:
Originally Posted by erubin
...I live in a relatively coastal area so runoff into the the ocean concerns me. All my chemical spraying runoff is captured and periodically carried to a recyling location, that includes coolant too , which I store seperately for recycle/disposal.

...If so my problem with that is the amount of polluted runoff I'd generate and the wet messy surface and surroundings that remain with water.
Interesting, considering your willingness to do A/C work without recovery equippment.
__________________
1989 300 SEL that mostly works, but needs TLC
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page