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  #1  
Old 05-23-2002, 12:44 PM
Benz240D
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Where is the Oil Filter???

I just bought a 1974 Mercedes 240D - I cannot find an oil filter anywhere on the car!

I can find no place where it might even go (had someone taken it out). The AC pump was gone, but I don't use A/C anyhow so don't care.
AutoZone lists a oil filter.

I also think this car was originally a Military vehicle. Does anyone
know if Mercedes ever had a Drab Olive Green paint for their cars?

The paint is Not Glossy - it does shine up but only a shine - like a sheen shine. Not a gloss. The car when I bought it has been repainted - but not a real good paint job because they never took care to repaint in many of the not so obvious places.

So, what I am thinking, is either a 1974 240D never had a filter, or if it originally was a military vehicle it might not have had one for that reason. My friend's dad was a Paratrooper in WWII and he claims this car's color is definitely Military drab Green.

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  #2  
Old 05-23-2002, 02:09 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Old Lyme, Connecticut
Posts: 3,596
Benz 240D,

The filter is not the usual spin on type you may be looking for, it is a rather large, permanently mounted housing with a bolt on cap. TXBill is correct that it is located on the driver's side of the engine (on all but UK cars as they have the driver sitting on the other side) back against the firewall, and below the valve cover. Depending on the year, it will have two nuts on little flange ears or one central fastener holding the cover of the housing down. I will attach a photo of the cross section of the unit below for information. Good Luck, Jim
Attached Thumbnails
Where is the Oil Filter???-oil-filter-flow-path-post0rots.jpg  
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #3  
Old 05-23-2002, 02:32 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Old Lyme, Connecticut
Posts: 3,596
TXBill and Benz240D,

Please excuse my error. TXBill is correct. The W115 oil filter is the most perfect example of sadistic engineering I have ever encountered.

It is up inside the front suspension arms on the driver's side, and there is near no way to get it out without spilling black Diesel engine oil all over you. It has two separate oil filters, stacked on top of one another, for the main flow (a nylon screen assembly) and bypass flow (a more conventional can shaped thing with typical filter media inside. You can clean the main filter with gasoline and an old tooth brush and dry it with compressed air. I used to replace it every fourth or fifth oil change. The bypass element is not reusable and when you buy a filter that is usually all you get. The nylon deal is a little more money, typically around $20 as I recall. Been a while, but you never forget the misery involved. If you have a lift use it. But Larry Bible's mantra, "Change it hot and change it often" is pretty hard to live by on these things.

Same basic concept though, a reusable cannister sealed to the spigot like protrusion from the engine block with an O-ring. Getting it together without damaging the O-ring, or getting dirt on it and making sure the cannister is seated in the spigot correctly, and not cross threading the screw, is really a pain.

I have similar sketches in the manual for the W115 engine that I could scan and post if you think it would help. Sorry about the last misfire. Jim
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #4  
Old 05-23-2002, 06:57 PM
Benz240D
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Posts: n/a
JohnSmith and TXBill - THANKS! At least I now know where it tarnation to look! I know now the easy way, let some kid at the QuakerState QuickLube get himself introduced to diesel engine oil :-)

I got my 1978 240D clean enough so that I don't need a bath in Orange GoJo everytime I look at it.
I am now trying to get this 1974 115 240D the same. The great thing about a diesel is I can powerwash the engine While Running and not worry about fouled plugs! Or wires!

As to the Oil Filter, I wonder if I can't make get me one of those re-location spin-on filter adapters work. All I'd have to do is find the right fitting for the engine and run some hoses. Wouldn't be any different than what they use in Racing where they use a dry sump and a tank and filter is located where ever you want to locate it. I think summit has them.
I may get a oil bath one time, but if I can it work and sell it, it'll sure make another owner a mighty happy camper!

Thanks ever so much!

This forum is I think a blessing to me! In the few short days I'be been a member, I sure have learned a lot! So there is proof - You can teach an old dog new tricks!



Thanks again JohnSmith! & TXBill!

Now for the hunt!
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  #5  
Old 05-23-2002, 07:05 PM
Benz240D
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Posts: n/a
Now there is the reason why one should proof read before hitting submit button - my language/english/writing/typo's is terrible!
And now it is like using permanent ink.
Can't fix it, yes, it bothers me!
Makes it look like I've not had an education!
scream-scream-hollar-hollar!
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  #6  
Old 05-23-2002, 07:37 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: central Texas
Posts: 17,277
Did you notice the little button that says "edit" ? You actually can fix whatever you want to..
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  #7  
Old 05-23-2002, 07:40 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: central Texas
Posts: 17,277
JimSmith, WEEELLLLL, I guess you have been right a few more times than you have been wrong... so we can overlook it this time... but please be more careful in the future..... Greg
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  #8  
Old 05-23-2002, 09:18 PM
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Old Lyme, Connecticut
Posts: 3,596
Greg,

Thanks for your support! Of course I will try to read some of these posts before I answer them in future, but that can be limiting. I guess I'll just deal with it.

I thought MB engineers got over their nasty tendencies with the W123 oil filter layout, but the 1988 W124 300E is evidence the cure did not take. What a step backwards. I see the later cars went back to the standard set with the W123, but it seems you got to keep watching those guys.

Jim
__________________
Own:
1986 Euro 190E 2.3-16 (291,000 miles),
1998 E300D TurboDiesel, 231,000 miles -purchased with 45,000,
1988 300E 5-speed 252,000 miles,
1983 240D 4-speed, purchased w/136,000, now with 222,000 miles.
2009 ML320CDI Bluetec, 89,000 miles

Owned:
1971 220D (250,000 miles plus, sold to father-in-law),
1975 240D (245,000 miles - died of body rot),
1991 350SD (176,560 miles, weakest Benz I have owned),
1999 C230 Sport (45,400 miles),
1982 240D (321,000 miles, put to sleep)
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  #9  
Old 05-23-2002, 09:32 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: eastern ND
Posts: 657
Brazed a nut (not a pipe plug) on the bottom corner of the filter housing. Bolt and copper washer into the nut, pull new bolt and drain hot oil before pulling center bolt. Also fit a square hard rubber gasket where the big o-ring goes. Both take a bit of misery out of changing the oil filter.

Next summer's project is to make an adapter plate for a spin on filter. Will be a bit of a challenge as the existing plumbing is a bit goofy.
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daBenz - 1970 220D
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  #10  
Old 05-23-2002, 09:51 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: central Texas
Posts: 17,277
JimSmith, Read them before posting your answer? I guess you have completely lost your " Spirit of Adventure " Greg

DABenz, how about some pictures of that for the FAQ pages ? Sounds like a good deal...
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  #11  
Old 05-24-2002, 08:22 AM
Benz240D
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I See "dabenz" likes to do what I like to do, remanufacturing - making something better than it was. Improve upon that which is already made.
That is why most Ford racing guys use that Re-Locator for the oil filter, Where was Ford's brain when they placed a filter at a 45 degree angle? Or look at what Briggs&Straton done, placed the filter on horizontally! So as soon as you start taking it off you get oil all over the place! What do these Engineers do, Smoke their meals?
Everyone has seen the Peogot, right? well their ignition electronics are straight up GM! GM puts it in the distributor, Peogot puts in a box and calls it their own. Uh huh, right!

Here I was the one stressing to my brother to buy US made cars, now here I am starting my own collection of Mercedes!

Show me where I can buy a "USED" US made car and drive it 250,000 miles and then sell it or part it out and get all my money back! I call a Mercedes a very wise investment!

The 240D 115 chassis I bought for $202.00 nice condition - I took it off the trailer and drove it! In less than 2 days it has taken me over 150 miles. That auto tranny - is going to take some getting used to - I hate hitting the Brake for the Clutch, it makes life interesting!

Last edited by Benz240D; 05-24-2002 at 08:29 AM.
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  #12  
Old 05-24-2002, 09:39 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: eastern ND
Posts: 657
Leathermang,

Did the stuff in the late ‘70s (grandpa was pushing 80 and we were getting really tired of him spilling hot oil over himself and the shop). Don’t have a digital camera either and probably won’t change oil until July, depending on whether I have time to do a road trip this year. Will try to describe now and take regular photo when I pull filter.


Gasket: Was a square hard rubber gasket, like on a modern spin-on filter. I think the thickness was about 2/3 or 3/4 of the o-ring groove depth. Used a pair of dividers (a compass with two sharp points) and measured inner and outer o-ring groove diameters. Transferred diameters to square gasket, drew circles with a compass, placed gasket on scrap plywood, and trimmed with a razor knife so that I could just see the lines. This made the gasket about 1/32” “too big” and is what you want. Probably got it right on the second or third try. Cleaned the o-ring groove with gasoline and dried with a rag. Pressed dry gasket in dry o-ring groove and it has been there since. Just remember to oil the surface you see like you do a spin on filter.


Oil filter housing drain: Size a steel nut so that the distance across the flats is a little shorter than the width of the flat part of one of the housing bottom flutes, toward the side of the housing. If the difference is the diameter of a 3/32” brazing rod then it’s perfect. The thicker the nut the better, and it doesn’t matter if it’s coarse or fine thread, metric or SAE. Shape the hole-side of the nut so the nut fits flat on the flute. I think I put a bolt in the nut, the nut hole-side-up in a vise, and then used files. The bolt is to keep the vise from deforming the nut. Temporarily “glue” the nut to the flute with a dab of Permatex and mark the hole center with a sharp punch. Remove the nut, clean off the Permatex and emery cloth the nut and the flute where the nut will go, plus about 1/2”. Drill a pilot hole, then size to be a hair larger than the bolt. Put a bolt in the nut all the way, put the bolt through the hole, and put another nut on the inside. Finger tight is enough. Braze the nut to the housing, then fillet with a larger rod. Quality counts here: you don’t want to inadvertently braze the bolt to the nut. Remove the inner nut and mark the bolt where it comes through the housing. Remove the bolt and cut off “too long” – about the thickness of a copper washer that you fit to the bolt. Mount the housing so that the new drain is the low spot.


This sounds like a lot of work but it saves me time and aggravation when changing oil and filter.

Looks like Benz240D is learning the German Engineering Axiom: "Why simple when complicated will do". One of the worlds best engines because of superior machinists, not superior engineers.
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daBenz - 1970 220D
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  #13  
Old 05-24-2002, 11:32 PM
Benz240D
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I'm about to forget the German Technology and do a bit of backyard

rigging engineering on the stinkin Ignition! Darn thing has almost left me stranded about 4 times too many!
I thought it was the key switch acting up, but the pull start ain't functioning and the starter button someone put in there ain't makin contact every time either.
I may just do to it the same way I done that VW diesel I used to have.
Flip a switch, juice was either on or off. Another button (momentary 50amp) fired the glow plugs and another (50amp) button fired the engine up! I ran 8 gauge wire. The "key" was just there for looks! Ran it like that until one day the timing chain broke and that put an end to the 40mpg! Took it to the dead yard. But I kept my switches!
For the Glow plugs, I just counted to 20 and hit the fire button! If it didn't fire, give it another hot shot and that time I'd just hold the glowplug button in while hitting the fire button! Off to work we went!
Now that is American Figurin! Diesel fires on compression, it need to be rolled over - Starter, It needs glow plugs to warm up the fire area. That simple!
If you can turn the switch on, a US quarter will fire up a diesel! Done it many times on a dozer.

As for the oil, it too is going to get some remanufacturing, and as for the Who knows what size hex, it is going to get a Bolt!
What brain dead idiot put an allen wrench bolt in the oil pan!!!????
Okay, I like the car, it has some bugs that need to be worked on. it may not be Mercedes when I get done, but I bet it works a whole lot better!

Just like the seat, the mounts rusted, well that wood block I bet don't rust and those bolts straight through the floor holds it tight!
Like I said, backyard engineering! If it works, do it!

As for draining the oil hot, that is a very stupid way of doing things! Number one reason - when it is cold, "All" of the oil is where? in the pan, not resting somewhere up on top side waiting to drip down. Then wait about 30 minutes for it all to drain out. Wait an hour, go watch the football game. Now, when you put oil in, it is all fresh oil. No contaminates still lurking inside the engine.
Think about it, makes perfect sense.
When you check the oil Hot and then wait an hour and check it, what happens? the oil is higher on the dipstick huh? Bingo! all that oil is now in a place where it can Drain ALL out, not leaving half of it on the rockers!

Oh, and for those of you that like your Mercedes a lot and don't want some fool coming along and stealing it - here is a sure fire way to stop theft all together!
My brother-n-law does it on his company trucks (diesel) only one time did some kids try to steal one, they got caught!
He put in a Fuel Shut Off switch. Put it in a out of way place, not so convenient but stops theft too! So they only get as far as the diesel fuel in the lines! and if the shut off switch is close to the engine, guess who doesn't go very far?

The would be criminals never made it to the fence! Cops were waiting for them on the other side - oops!

This post was edited for content: Racial slurs will not be tolerated on this forum/TXBill

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