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  #1  
Old 10-20-2003, 10:43 AM
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Bleed the Clutch 82 240d?

the way the haynes manual describes the procedure, it looks like the dirty brake fluid gets recycled back to the reservoir? what is wrong with getting it out completely the same way i do for the brake cylinders? what am i missing here....
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  #2  
Old 10-20-2003, 11:37 AM
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I just replaced the clutch master cylinder on my 83 240d last week. I tried everything - there are no shortcuts around using reverse bleeding through the slave cylinder. I went to AutoZone and bought 3 feet of 3/16" ID fuel line. This works perfectly to go from your passenger side caliper bleeder to the slave cylinder bleeder. The deal here is that the clutch pedal attaches to an actuator rod. When you push the pedal down, it pushes the piston of the clutch master cylinder in, but when you let go of the pedal, the rod comes back up but it has no way of pulling the piston back up. This is the reason you can't "pump" the pedal to bleed it like you can on the brake system. The procedure is actually easier than it sounds and can be done by one person (I had to - my car broke down at work which is 30 miles away from my house). You can open each bleeder, attach the hose at each bleeder, pump the brakes until the clutch pedal comes up, wait a few minutes to make sure the air bleeds back up out of the clutch system, then go to each bleeder and tighten the bleeder. Then you can remove the hose. I found that it actually bled my brakes and I now have better pedal on my brakes too. If you wanted to change fluid in your system this would be a good opportunity to do so - I bought a big bottle of synthetic DOT3/DOT4 fluid at AutoZone for $3.99. Hope this helps.

Lance
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  #3  
Old 10-20-2003, 12:58 PM
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To flush out the fluid, you can remove the clutch supply line from the brake fluid reservoir. Temporarily cap the nipple on the reservoir, and direct the hose into a jar where you'll collect the old fluid.
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  #4  
Old 10-20-2003, 06:29 PM
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I'm not following something here. In Arkie's post he says the rod is not attached and the piston will not come back. What makes it come back under normal conditions? I bled the clutch slave on my 307d the way I have always bled clutch slaves. Have someone push the clutch down and hold it down. Open the bleeder on the slave cylinder and let the air out. Close the bleeder and release the clutch pedal. Repeat until all the air is gone.

Can someone give another explanation as to why this will not work on the sedan?
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  #5  
Old 10-20-2003, 07:55 PM
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Because the pressure line is on the top and the bleed screw is on the side. If you're able to make an air bubble float out the side of the slave cylinder, then you're much more talented than I. Maybe it would help to have the car pointed down a steep hill.

Even more of a problem is the clutch master cylinder, which is mounted vertically next to the pedal. The supply line is on the top, and the pressure line is near the bottom. I can't see any way that pedal pushing could get all the air out.

Both problems, however, are easily solved by reverse bleeding.
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  #6  
Old 10-20-2003, 08:21 PM
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While the master in my 307d is horizontal, the slave is the same as in the sedan and I had no problem bleeding it the 'normal' way.
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  #7  
Old 10-21-2003, 09:49 AM
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Bleeding the 240D clutch

As complicated as the reverse bleeding procedure sounds, it ends up being much easier than conventional bleeding because you can do it by yourself. When you attach the hose to the brake system, you turn the brake system and clutch system into one system. Because they share a common resorvoir, air bubbles from both the brakes and clutch will come back up through the clutch cylinders and effectively bleed both the caliper you attach the hose to and the entire clutch hydraulics. If you get the 3/16" fuel line I mentioned, you don't have to worry about the line blowing off of the bleeders (unless you violently pump the brake pedal).
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  #8  
Old 04-26-2005, 09:51 PM
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I'll be replacing the fluid in my clutch and brake system in my '82 240D shortly.

I bought a Motive Power Bleeder, but haven't used it yet. I'm wondering how I can make this work, given that the hose from the brake reservoir (I need to replace this hose because it's leaking bad) goes into the top of a vertically oriented clutch master cylinder.

The idea of "reverse bleeding" sounds logical here, but I'm having a hard time picturing what exactly I need to do.

I was thinking about loosening the nut on the steel line at the bottom of the clutch master cylinder, and using the power bleeder to force new fluid in from the top (thus forcing old fluid out the bottom where I loosen the nut).

Does this sound do-able?

- Patrick
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  #9  
Old 04-26-2005, 11:30 PM
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The reverse bleed method will probably be the easiest way to do it. You use the bleed fitting on the passenger's side front caliper, attach one end of a fuel-line quality hose to it, and attach the other end to the bleed fitting on the bottom of the clutch slave cylinder. Then you use an open-end wrench to open both fittings. You then use the brake pedal to force the fluid and air back up through the system and back into the common reservoir. The reason you have to do this is because the acuating rod on the clutch master cylinder (sitting vertically on the inside of the firewall) is not actually attached to the cylinder. If the system is not bled, when you push the clutch pedal down the spring pulls the pedal back but the piston in the master cylinder remains depressed - therefore you can't just pump the pedal to bleed it like a brake system.
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  #10  
Old 04-27-2005, 09:32 AM
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I have always bled mine successfully from the top down with a pressure bleeder, athough I have heard that the bottom up method is recommended. Now I have never had to bleed mine from scratch or with any air in the system, so maybe the top down method won't work in those instances, but with a functioning clutch and when just doing a fluid change, top down has always worked okay for me.

Len
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  #11  
Old 04-28-2005, 10:31 PM
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I will try reverse bleeding.

I have ordered some of the "blue" DOT4 brake fluid, so I will know for sure when the old "brown" fluid is all pumped out and the new "blue" fluid is there, and I will flush out my whole brake and clutch systems.

I wonder if there is a clear hose that could be used between the brake bleed nipple and the clutch slave cylinder bleed nipple? Like aquarium hose.... ?

That way I could see the fluid moving in the hose, and that would help me know for sure if I was doing it right, and how far along I'm getting.

Anybody done anything like that?

Also, does anybody know the exact inside diameter size of the braided hose between the brake reservior and the clutch master cylinder? Mine is swollen and deteriorated, but it looks like 8mm. Does that sound right?

Thanks,

- Patrick
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  #12  
Old 05-17-2017, 11:29 AM
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Air Getting Into Line, No Fluid Leaks

I know this is an old thread, but I'm hoping somebody sees this and, if possible, confirms my suspicion. About a week ago my clutch hydraulics began getting air in the line. I have successfully bled it out, restoring a firm "near-the-top-again" clutch pedal. But after driving it 30 minutes, and even just sitting overnight, I'm back where I started with air in the line. I cannot detect any fluid loss whatsoever, from the reservoir through the master cylinder down the lines to the slave cylinder (which I replaced less than a year ago). None.

My best guess is the clutch master cylinder has developed a leak -- that's the only place I can imagine the mechanics of air getting into the system with absolutely no fluid leaving the system. And, of course, I'll need to replace it and then bleed the whole thing out again.

Can anyone here confirm my guess? Add to or provide an alternative possibility?

Thanks sincerely in advance.
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