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  #1  
Old 02-17-2018, 09:37 PM
sixto's Avatar
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GM transmission cooler line clips

I can get the clips out easily with a pick but I canít get them to seat again with the line in place. Does the line go on the fitting then the clip, or does the clip go on the fitting then press the line in place?

Sixto
98 E320s sedan and wagon

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  #2  
Old 02-19-2018, 01:27 PM
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you can do it either way. I find it easier to install the clip and shove the line in with some grease or assy goo to assist it.

Its a wise thing to replace the little O ring inside with a new one to prevent leaks.
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  #3  
Old 02-24-2018, 09:22 PM
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Yeah! HEAVEN FORBID a car-maker should have to screw anything on the car together anymore!
Another one of those crap 'quick-connect' assembly-line innovations that wasted too much of my time last Summer when I had to replace a Pontiac G6 radiator.
You're supposed to install the clips, then push the lines in until they 'click'.
The O-ring bores in the new Chinese radiator were made just a hair under-size and I struggled for 3 hours, before I realized there was no way to ever get those lines to click. Then I had to pull it all apart and go find a different brand Chinese radiator, which still took a lot of wrestling, wiggling, prying and cursing to get both lines to click!

Happy Motoring, Mark
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Old 02-24-2018, 10:00 PM
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i blew a transmission becasue of em.i had the trans out to replace the rear main seal and the lines on the trans had a little plastic sleeve that snap on the fitting after you get the line snapped on it covers the clip so it can't pop out.well unbeknownst to me when i snapped one of the sleeves on it cracked.bout 50 miles later it popped off on my wife when she was going to work,dumped all the fluid out and she fried the 2-3 clutch.
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  #5  
Old 02-24-2018, 10:36 PM
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Originally Posted by catmandoo62 View Post
i blew a transmission becasue of em.i had the trans out to replace the rear main seal and the lines on the trans had a little plastic sleeve that snap on the fitting after you get the line snapped on it covers the clip so it can't pop out.well unbeknownst to me when i snapped one of the sleeves on it cracked.bout 50 miles later it popped off on my wife when she was going to work,dumped all the fluid out and she fried the 2-3 clutch.
Yeah. I forgot about those plastic retainers. It was a fight to install those too!

Happy Motoring, Mark
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Old 02-26-2018, 06:12 PM
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thats odd,

I have had no problems in doing/undoing those fittings, slather some vaseline on it and push it home - Whenever I disturb one in an older car, I just unscrew the fitting replace the O ring inside. You can also buy its actual quick disconnect tool too, its like a round metal sleeve which expands the clip.

GM fuel line quick disconnect are nice, then I think BMW inspected a GM vehicle and decided to use those in every hose and fitting - power steering lines smack up the rad support - yep you have that plastic fitting which needs to be pushed in with a special tool.
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1995 E300D - The original humming machine (consumed by Flood 2017)
2000 E320 - The evolution (consumed by flood 2017)
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Old 02-26-2018, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Zulfiqar View Post
thats odd,

I have had no problems in doing/undoing those fittings, slather some vaseline on it and push it home - Whenever I disturb one in an older car, I just unscrew the fitting replace the O ring inside. You can also buy its actual quick disconnect tool too, its like a round metal sleeve which expands the clip.

GM fuel line quick disconnect are nice, then I think BMW inspected a GM vehicle and decided to use those in every hose and fitting - power steering lines smack up the rad support - yep you have that plastic fitting which needs to be pushed in with a special tool.
On a 2006 Pontiac G-6 radiator, there is no plastic fitting on the cooler lines to push in with a special tool.
There are two wire clips that are pulled out from the side or top of the fitting with a pick or small screwdriver to release the lines, after prying off two captive plastic retaining collars. You can't unscrew the fittings from the radiator without letting loose the cooler inside the plastic radiator tank.

Trying to get the bottom cooler line to 'click' home during re-assembly can be a real struggle with the extremely cramped space between the V6 engine, radiator and fan-housing. Same thing for the captive plastic collar that needs to be snapped back on to the end of the fitting without breaking it, in order keep the wire clip from popping loose.
All this even with the entire bumper/nose/grille assy. and headlights removed, which is the only way to replace the radiator one one of these turkeys.

Happy Motoring, Mark
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Old 02-26-2018, 11:18 PM
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I used line release tools on a Ford fuel filter. I should have tried them here. Oh well.

I tried on a couple of three transmission coolers at the pick-n-pull. I could never push a line back in place with the clip already in the collar. From what I saw, the flare in the line isn’t tapered to make it possible as with the Ford fuel line.

Sixto
98 E320s sedan and wagon
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  #9  
Old 02-27-2018, 01:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sixto View Post
I used line release tools on a Ford fuel filter. I should have tried them here. Oh well.

I tried on a couple of three transmission coolers at the pick-n-pull. I could never push a line back in place with the clip already in the collar. From what I saw, the flare in the line isn’t tapered to make it possible as with the Ford fuel line.

Sixto
98 E320s sedan and wagon
Pontiac G6 tranny lines are different from a Ford fuel filter, and reconnecting them was the big problem.
With the radiator installed, there just isn't room to get both hands in there to push and hold the bottom line in place while trying to work the clip into the slot.
For me, because of the real possibility of also dropping & loosing a clip
the best option was to insert the clips first, then install the radiator, wrestle the lines until they clicked into place, and finally, wrestle the plastic clip retainers until they snapped into place.

Happy Motoring, Mark
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Old 02-27-2018, 11:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark DiSilvestro View Post
On a 2006 Pontiac G-6 radiator, there is no plastic fitting on the cooler lines to push in with a special tool.
There are two wire clips that are pulled out from the side or top of the fitting with a pick or small screwdriver to release the lines, after prying off two captive plastic retaining collars. You can't unscrew the fittings from the radiator without letting loose the cooler inside the plastic radiator tank.

Trying to get the bottom cooler line to 'click' home during re-assembly can be a real struggle with the extremely cramped space between the V6 engine, radiator and fan-housing. Same thing for the captive plastic collar that needs to be snapped back on to the end of the fitting without breaking it, in order keep the wire clip from popping loose.
All this even with the entire bumper/nose/grille assy. and headlights removed, which is the only way to replace the radiator one one of these turkeys.

Happy Motoring, Mark

This is the tool



you can do without it - just pull the clip out sideways. The tool does make it easy if the downward angle provides some space for it. The little nub in the tool is for the inwards triangle the clip has, just squeeze it in, let it go and pull out the line (easier said than done in some rusty cases).

using assembly goo on the line helps a lot otherwise it becomes a real struggle as you are trying to expand a dry O ring and then fighting a the locking clip. The goo lets it slide in. (the cheapo replacement line adapters with new radiators are moronic, sometimes they have wrong orings in them and their line clips are thinner than a cats hair)
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1995 E300D - The original humming machine (consumed by Flood 2017)
2000 E320 - The evolution (consumed by flood 2017)
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  #11  
Old 02-27-2018, 05:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zulfiqar View Post
This is the tool



you can do without it - just pull the clip out sideways. The tool does make it easy if the downward angle provides some space for it. The little nub in the tool is for the inwards triangle the clip has, just squeeze it in, let it go and pull out the line (easier said than done in some rusty cases).

using assembly goo on the line helps a lot otherwise it becomes a real struggle as you are trying to expand a dry O ring and then fighting a the locking clip. The goo lets it slide in. (the cheapo replacement line adapters with new radiators are moronic, sometimes they have wrong orings in them and their line clips are thinner than a cats hair)
As I said, getting the lines out wasn't the big problem.

With the first radiator, the bores at the O-ring were undersized in the aluminum fittings. So the tips of the lines wouldn't even begin to enter. With the second radiator, after a prolonged struggle, the lines and collars finally clicked & snapped in place. And there was plenty of "goo" - just not enough wrestling-space!
I suppose this means we should just plan on buying new radiators from the dealer - assuming we can afford the price, and a new GM factory radiator is even available for a 12 year-old car!

Happy Motoring, Mark

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