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  #1  
Old 02-10-2006, 11:44 AM
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Wise maintenance that's not in the manual

Fella's,
Would be interested to learn from you what maintenance you consider wise to carry out that's not listed in the service manual (preferably W210). I mean, for instance, changing diff oil, or changing fluid of the powersteering.

Thanks,
V.

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  #2  
Old 02-10-2006, 12:31 PM
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Just did the differential and am about to do the power steering on mine. Did the transmission fluid once at about 50,000 miles and will do it again by 100,000 miles. Other than that I generally follow the recommended jobs in the A and B service manual.

Len
'99 E300TD 87,000 miles
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  #3  
Old 02-11-2006, 12:25 PM
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I tend to "over" maintain my cars.

For my 98 E320 I change the rear diff, trans fluid, power steering fluid around 75K miles.
Fuel filter every 60K miles.
Air filter every 30K miles.
Pollen filters every 15K miles.
The brake fluid every 2 years, radiator flush & fluid every 3 years.
Oil changes every 5K miles.

I do not believe in "filled for life" fluids for cars.
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1998 Mercedes E320, 200K Miles
2001 Acura 3.2TL, 178K Miles
1992 Chevy Astro, 205K Miles
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  #4  
Old 02-11-2006, 12:53 PM
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A few more maintenance items not mentioned:
Throttle Body Service/Cleaning - 100K
Shocks/Struts as needed
Rust proofing - annual - prolongs life of body and underneath brake lines, etc
Detailing/Cleaning - body,interior,and engine
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  #5  
Old 02-12-2006, 02:42 PM
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Don't forget the ol' crank position sensor... They DO wear-out , a failure CAN leave you on the side of the road , costs ONLY about $40 , and takes ALL of 5 or 10 minutes to replace (no-brainer).
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  #6  
Old 02-12-2006, 05:43 PM
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Location: Long Beach ,California
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Question crank position sensor?

Is this something I should have for a 1992 300-E M103 9083 single cam six cylinder motor. I have no probles at this time and the car is like brand new (time capsule) I have been servicing the fluids and replaced the brake pads. Getting ready to flush the Power steering fluid and do a transmission filter service.

Anything I should look out for or buy to have would be helpfull.

thank You

Bob Geco
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  #7  
Old 02-12-2006, 06:36 PM
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The CPS relies on magnetic flux, which will degrade with time and use, but it doesn't seem to be a common failure item, and most that fail appear to be on cars with well over 100K miles.

Given enough operating time and weather (heat cycles, vibration, and corrosion) every electrical and electronic component on the car is going to fail, so if you carry this to the extreme, you replace EVERYTHING, or just scrap the old car and buy a new one.

Given your current mileage, rate of mileage accumulation, and Southern California domicile your 300E will probably outlive you as will my 190E likely outlive me.

Duke
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  #8  
Old 02-12-2006, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Is this something I should have for a 1992 300-E M103 9083 single cam six cylinder motor. I have no probles at this time and the car is like brand new (time capsule) I have been servicing the fluids and replaced the brake pads. Getting ready to flush the Power steering fluid and do a transmission filter service.
Yes your 300E has one. It's located hovering just above the harmonic balancer and it plugs into the EZL ignition module located on the driver's side fenderwell.
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  #9  
Old 02-12-2006, 10:06 PM
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No, the magnetic pickup on the front of the engine is PURELY a diagnostic device to detect engine RPM with the MB test set. The lead attaches to the diagnostic socket, NOT the EZL module.

It has NOTHING to do with engine operation.

The CPS that is used by the EZL is on the LH side rear of the block and it detects the three segments on the flywheel or flexplate - one for each TDC.

Duke
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  #10  
Old 02-12-2006, 11:53 PM
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Quote:
The lead attaches to the diagnostic socket, NOT the EZL module.
Well that sure is news to me because my TDC/Crankshaft position sensor runs directly to the EZL unit and plugs in via a coaxial connection just next to the vacuum connection.
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  #11  
Old 02-13-2006, 01:06 PM
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Thermostat

And some OEM thermostat housings were plastic, the replacements are metal and should probably be changed.
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  #12  
Old 02-13-2006, 01:22 PM
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Fuses !!!!!!
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  #13  
Old 02-13-2006, 01:49 PM
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Location: ajax, ontario, canada
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front wheel bearings

Looking at my maintenance booklet, I see no entry for inspecting the front wheel bearings (or the rear ones).

I was running at highway speeds when one of my left front wheel bearings failed, and the reason I noticed it was that it was making expensive-sounding noises. Stopping off to inspect the wheel, I jacked up the car, and found that the wheel seemed to have no play when the top or bottom was pulled laterally, but it indeed had that grumbling bearing failure noise when rotated.

Turns out, the inner bearing failed, and all hell broke loose there, with the bearing material eating into the spindle and hub, both of which were expensive, with the spindle quite difficult to source as well. Considering that the spindle and hub do not normally fail, these were write-offs for me.

Looking back, it never occurred to me to regularly check my front wheel bearings for play or noises, and I surely will be doing this regularly, at least when I change my tires for the seasons, or when I rotate them.

I normally drive on the left lane of the highway, which slopes slightly downwards on the left for drainage pruposes, and this imposes more load on the inner front bearing, which has probably caused its premature wear.

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