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  #1  
Old 03-14-2001, 08:36 PM
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I am in the process of preparing to change the timing chain on my 1985 300D. I have taken a look at fastlane.com and reviewed the manual on the procedure. It looks like MB has a chain that you crimp on and that is what is shown in the manual. A local import parts shop has a chain that you put together with a master link in addition to this type being available from fastlane.com. What are the opinions on the "crimped" chain versus one with a master link? I rode motorcycles for years with a chain/master link and can't say I ran into any problems as long as I changed it when the chain was worn. I would think too, that a single row chain on a Harley Davidson sees alot more severe service than a double row chain in oil. The only reason cost is an object is because of the price of the crimping tool.

thanks
Jim
'85 300D
'95 E320
'97 CRV
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  #2  
Old 03-14-2001, 10:05 PM
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Maybe I stand Corrected

Greetings Jim,

I think I did the same search on Parts shop and I took it to say that you needed the master link to go along with the chain and it still needed to be crimped like the original. Hopefully I'm wrong becuse I intend to change my chain out as well this Summer, and I've priced the tool as well, and for $190. I have better use of my money. I think the master link is still a part of the complete chain that must be purchased seperately, but isn't the easy slip clip master we all would hope for.


Charles
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  #3  
Old 03-14-2001, 10:21 PM
engatwork's Avatar
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can-do after reading

a little closer I think you are correct. Although, it says master link it still requires the crimping tool.
Jim
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  #4  
Old 03-14-2001, 10:30 PM
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Jim if you buy it, I will rent it

Greetings Jim,

I was afraid of that, and like so many others I wish we had not only a parts shop but a rental tool shop as well for specialized tools that most of us will probably only use either once in 100,000 miles or ten years, whichever comes first.

This could be a business opportunity for you.


Charles
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  #5  
Old 03-15-2001, 07:46 AM
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What I think the discussion is a trying to get at is there are two different methods to connect a chain. 1) Crimped master link and 2) and a "keyed" link (it's a slip link affair).

I do know that the "keyed" links are available with chains. Trouble is i have never been able to tell if the chain is from the OEM.

And with a chain, I would prefer to stay with the OEM.

I did ask Partshop what theirs was and it's the crimped style. IPD (a Volvo parts house) does rent tools. They charge you the full price and then refund you, less the rental, upon return. Problem is the heat that is generated by the few who return tools in crappy condition.

Good luck.
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  #6  
Old 03-15-2001, 11:36 AM
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I have used the safety clip style many times with no failures.
The important thing is to install the clip with the nose [ closed end ] in the direction of chain travel.

Another trick I use is to put an oil soaked rag and magnet under the chain area when grinding off the old link pin heads.
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  #7  
Old 03-15-2001, 02:16 PM
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Crimp it man!

When I replace my chain, I will use the crip method and not worry about it any more.
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  #8  
Old 03-15-2001, 08:20 PM
LarryBible
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The keyed link is for connecting the new chain to the old while feeding it through. Once the new chain is in place, use the crimped link only.

Good luck,
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  #9  
Old 03-15-2001, 09:31 PM
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Thanks Larry, I thought that was right

Greetings Larry,

I can't say I've heard of any other way to install a timing chain than to crimp it in place. I would however like to figure out or have someone explain to me how you can figure timing chain stretch. I always hear or read about degrees that the chain is retarded the engine, but with no indicators on either the cam gear or the lower timing marks, how can someone do an educated guess as far as how many degrees their chain is off? I don't have incremental marks on either end of my engine, so how can I tell.


Charles
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  #10  
Old 03-15-2001, 10:33 PM
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The chain repair with master link is an M/Benz
Workshop Manual acceptable repair.

http://members.aol.com/ajdalton7/mbjob515.jpg
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  #11  
Old 03-15-2001, 11:44 PM
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Charles,

If you want to find out the chain stretch for 617 engine, search this forum for "measuring timing chain" and you will find a post from Steve dated 3/23/2000. He gave the offical way to measure the chain stretch by using a dial indicator.

David
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  #12  
Old 03-16-2001, 08:54 AM
LarryBible
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be549 makes a good suggestion. You will, however, need the exact data for your exact engine. When you follow the procedure, you will be able to determine stretch degrees by observing the marks on the damper.

Good luck,
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  #13  
Old 03-17-2001, 09:59 PM
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I Stand Corrected

Greetings,

After recieving my cd manual for my 300TD I went browsing for various answers and I came across the timing chain replacement section. It did show a slip clip installation used on a chain replacement, but didn't give a P/N for the chain. I think it would be easier than crimping myself, let alone the price of the tool to do it. I've owned many motorcycles, and if they work on them with the abuse that they recieve, then a little ole diesel shouldn't even faze that design. Anyone know who may carry such a replacement link for the 300 series?


Charles
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  #14  
Old 03-18-2001, 11:58 AM
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Charles, I have come up with two master link part numbers. I don't think that the timing chain comes with the master link normally, so you have to order it, and you can probably order either style.

Fastlane lists this as the "ballpeen crimp style master link", 000 997 23 98 for $1.43 OE by Iwis, same as the chain.

Another website lists this part number for the master link, and calls it "master link for diesels early style"
000 997 02 98 for $1.47. This number when entered manually at the Fastlane comes up with a part with the same price as the one above. So it is possible they are the same part?

My 617.95 engine manual makes no mention of crimping, it shows a master link with two lock washers and they should be in the front of the timing chain.
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  #15  
Old 03-18-2001, 04:47 PM
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To Msster link or NOT?

After nearly 45 years in maintaining lots of different kinds of equipment with lots of roller chains, I have NEVER had a clip type master link come apart. This has been on cars, aircraft, farm equipment, boats, industrial equipment slow speed, very high speed, shock loads, you name it. The 'clip type' master links are at least as good a 'crimped' , and undoubtedly far more certain than a crimp job by inexperienced DIY'er.
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