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  #1  
Old 03-28-2001, 07:52 PM
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Changed my fuel filters on the road today. (1980 300CD)
Started out on a trip to inspect some cargo and the thing wouldn't go over 60. Surged and halted. Changed primary and secondary. Looked like someone had put a lot of fine dirt in the tank by the way the filters looked. Came home feeling like a racehorse. Just an idea for the inquiring mind. Steve
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  #2  
Old 03-28-2001, 08:49 PM
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Maybe even a bit of algeacide treatment to keep the little growing things in check.
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  #3  
Old 03-28-2001, 10:26 PM
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morainme
Thanks for the tank filter tip. I'll look into it.

Mike
The algicide is a possibility too. I think this guy I bought it from may have had it idle for some time--and warm.Steve
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  #4  
Old 03-29-2001, 12:59 AM
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What do you do with the algicide? Haven't heard of this.
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  #5  
Old 03-29-2001, 01:28 AM
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ymsim,

With diesel fuel, there is the possibility of algea in the tank. Interesting how a motor fuel can support a life form. You do not have to worry about this with a gas/petrol/benzine engine, as algea would not survive. Algeacide in the diesel fuel will help to kill off this filter clogging life form, but may not cure it. In extreme cases, the tank may need to be dropped and flushed thouroughly to rid it of this slimey pest.
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'73 280SEL 4.5 (9/72)- RIP
Only 8,173 units built from 5/71 thru 11/72

'02 CLK320 Cabriolet - wifey's mid-life crisis

2012 VW Jetta Sportwagon TDI...at least its a diesel

Non illegitemae carborundum.
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  #6  
Old 03-29-2001, 02:48 AM
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I have never read a post with eyes so wide as I did just now. Never knew we could have a tank of algaes in Diesel.

The only info I know of our diesel tanks (in our bus company) is that we have to regularly let the water condensation out - somewhat like a radiator flush - just beneath the tank. Let the little bit of water out, and then tighten it back. Doing this will produce efficient running with less black smoke.

Does diesel MB cars have that function too?

I'm wondering coz I have this feeling I'm looking at a 270E - a diesel. I have some good reviews about that, just don't know the price yet. Reckon it might be cheaper as its rolled of the Siamese plant and covered by the AFTA - i.e. less tariff $$$ for this particular model.

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  #7  
Old 03-29-2001, 02:58 AM
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YM, Are You Sure?

There are two systems on commercial diesel engines. I have never heard of bleeding off condensation of the fuel system, but there is an air brake system the requires regular bleeding, or at least an automatic bleed system.

Are you sure you're referencing the fuel and not brakes systems?
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  #8  
Old 03-29-2001, 03:09 AM
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Of course I am, Longston.

Its always a job requirement for our company technicians to check, and "bleed" (though its just really opening a nut at the bottom of the tank and letting the H2O out, and then tightening it back just when some traces of diesel can be seen) the diesel tanks when the buses are scheduled for their fortnightly service and inspection.

Maybe its only applicable for buses. Then again, our company 4-wheel drives (SUV you call it?) had to undergo the same mandatory function. Hence, I thought it applies for all diesel tanks.

I am even more sure because I incorporated this procedure into the driver's checklist in the event they spot excessive black smoke coming out from the rear (as advised by the HINO technicians during a workshop conducted for our drivers and maintanence crew).

From your note of surpise, maybe car-diesel tanks do not require this method of maintanence.
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  #9  
Old 03-29-2001, 10:34 PM
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A little water accumulates in any enclosed tank if air can enter and there are cold/warm cycles during the day. We have to check for water in the bottom of airplane fuel tanks each time we pre=flight. We simply drop a small stream out and that takes care of it. We use alcohol in gasoline tanks to absorb the condensate. Since a lot of gas nowadays comes with 10% alcohol added, that does it. A diesel tank will accumulate condensate just like anything else. In nice warm climates the temps stay high enough to limit the condensation somewhat but in the spring and fall there are days sufficiently above and below the dew point to deposit liquid water into the gas tank. Keeping a full tank is a way to reduce that but -------.A can of "Heat" in the tank now and then will do it.

Alge will usually grow in diesel fuel stored for a time --as in a car that is not run. Warmth is very good also. I have some diesel in a boat tank which hasn't been touched since 1989 and I run it a little now and then to keep the old girl lubed. No trouble so far. Cars that run through fuel on a regular basis do not usually suffer the "Attack of the Killer Alge" Steve
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  #10  
Old 03-29-2001, 10:55 PM
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Do we require the same bleeding process for diesel MB?
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  #11  
Old 03-30-2001, 09:46 AM
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Just a thought on bio-remediation. Once you have the problem, algecides are too late. The problem is the dead alge. The algecide might prevent but it won't touch the problem once the filters are plugging.
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  #12  
Old 03-30-2001, 04:26 PM
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News To Me, Y.M....

I know there is a fuel/water separator that is used in some diesel engines on commercial vehicles, but they usually just have a spin-on dessicant filter that gets changed regularly, or an automatic system that removes the trace water.

Maybe it's that you are in humid, sub-tropical Southeast Asia, and we're here in a mostly non humid climate, but I have never seen, heard of, or actually had to "bleed" water out of a diesel fuel system. Whatever condensation develops is usually so minor that it's burned up in the combustion process. Aside from that, the EPA would be all over the commercial transportation industry for the amount of diesel fuel finding it's way into ground water from the millions of trucks in this country "bleeding" their fuel systems.

And black smoke is not produced by having water in diesel fuel. It's produced by poorly trained drivers who mash down too hard on the throttle when taking off from a dead stop. If your company is having black smoke problems with your buses, then you need to train your drivers not to "overfuel" the engine by using a less "aggressive" throttle technique.
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  #13  
Old 03-31-2001, 12:56 AM
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I've learnt a fair deal on this thread, and I'm indebted to your views, Scott.

The black smoke has several causes, and one of which is traces of water mixed with fuel. I agree, in our hot and humid condition, vapour forms in the huge diesel tank - and we have to drain this little bit of water out (water being heavier than diesel will naturally lie at the bottom). This is normally done in the morning when it settles well.

Indeed many of the buses on our Malaysian roads do not practice this simple method of draining, thus causing unwarratned damage to the emgine, and increased emission of black smoke. The service technicians from HINO has repeated reminded us to perform this simple procedure.

Our drivers are trained to drive in the most professional manner - and the screening process is thorough as we do not wish to employ drivers who are incompetent. So much so, we have allocated an extra monthly incentive for upkeep of buses, which includes the way they drive, i.e. 1 complain and the incentive is deducted. So how, its a clean record for all our drivers.

Condensation is unavoidable. If its minor than it's burned up in the combustion process. But its not from what we have experienced. We get to extract approximately 10 ml fortnightly, +/- 10%.

Upon extraction, the waste are all deposited into a canister that will be taken by the oil company servicing our depot. So, we don't add any more pollution into the environment than there already is.

I am vey particular about this as I believe we shouldn't be doing things in the short term.

Its a Saturday, and wishing you'll a happy and safe weekend.




[Edited by ymsin on 03-31-2001 at 05:08 AM]
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  #14  
Old 04-01-2001, 11:23 PM
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I have personally experienced the algae problem in a sailboat with a diesel. It would almost die, and then surge. The problem turned out to be that the tank filter was completely clogged with algae! I would strongly suggest that you take a look at the tank filter to see if you have a problem. Algacide will prevent the problem, but not undo clogging.


Chuck
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  #15  
Old 04-02-2001, 01:07 PM
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Older MB diesels (190D) with the fuel filter insert instead of a screw on filter had a drain plug on the bottom of the filter case to drain off the water. I always wondered why they did away with it.

P E H
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