Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help



Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Mercedes-Benz Tech Information and Support > Tech Help

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-16-2006, 10:26 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10
Need to change brake pads on 95 E320. Easy job?

Hello everyone,

I want to change the brake pads on my 95 E320. Since I never did it before (on a Mercedes) I wonder if it is an easy job. I've done it on other cars and had no problems. In general when the pads are changed, do the rotors also require replacement? On the BMW I had to change the rotors and pads every time.

Any tips would be greatly appreciated. Do I need to bleed the line?

Thanks you all!!

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-16-2006, 10:53 AM
skiier3_9's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 975
The brakes are pretty easy to change on these cars. You'll want to reference this article from the DIY articles:

http://www.peachparts.com/Wikka/W124BrakePads

It has pretty much all you need. Most rotors have wear indicators and don't need to be replaced every time. The wear indicators are a small notch along the outside of the rotor (see my pic below) - just check them out - there are also minimum thickness specifications that other techs could post.
Attached Thumbnails
Need to change brake pads on 95 E320. Easy job?-brake_disc.jpg  
__________________
Daily Driver: 02 E430 4MATIC
In the family: '03 E500 // '04 ML500 // 64 220SE
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-16-2006, 01:55 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: St. Louis Missouri
Posts: 473
Easy job. Pay close attention to the routing of the wires on the wear indicators. If improperly placed on the outside of the pin clip, they will rub on the inside of the wheel. Once the insulation rubs off, contact will be made and your wear indicator dash light will come on.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-17-2006, 06:25 PM
EricSilver's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Fairfax, VA
Posts: 1,292
Easier than on my '89.

The only thing I would do differently than what is described in the DIY article is:

1.) Break off the old sensors; this makes removing the spring plates easier.

2.) Insert the new sensors into the new pad after replacing the spring plate. Again, makes spring plate replacement easier and faster.

3.) Use shims and paste to eliminate the possibility of brake squeal.
__________________
2008 E350 4matic / Black/Anthracite

------------------------------------
Gone but not Forgotten:
2001 E430 4matic, 206,xxx miles, Black/Charcoal
1995 E320, 252,xxx miles, Black/Grey
1989 260E, 223,00 miles, Black/Black
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-17-2006, 09:39 PM
I told you so!
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Motor City, MI
Posts: 2,845
Cheap as I am, I was able to reuse the old wear sensors by carefully extracting them from the old pads. Unless they're worn, there's nothing wrong with reusing the old sensors if you don't break them.

One thing that caught me by surprise that I never encountered on other brake jobs, was that I found that I couldn't fit the caliper over the rotor with new pads - there wasn't enough clearance. The problem was that I didn't clean all the packed-in grit from the pad mounting surfaces of the caliper. Use a wire brush and clean all that grit from the caliper to get the clearance you need.
__________________
95 E320 Cabriolet, 153K
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:55 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Southeastern PA
Posts: 3,053
Kestas, why would you remove the calipers to replace brake pads? That's the beauty of replacing brake pads on MB automobiles ... simplicity ... remove 2 pins ... no need to remove the calipers. Obviously to replace rotors you need to remove the calipers.
__________________
Fred Hoelzle
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-18-2006, 07:36 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Florida / N.H.
Posts: 8,804
A Tip that has not been mentioned is to open the bleeder when pushing the pistons back in. This gets rid of the old fluid/crap in the calipers [ where it accumulates] instead of sending it back up the line . Very important . This also makes piston much easier to push back in as there is no line pressure on the pistons. It also does not effect the masters res. level.
If doing pads on an ABS system, this is real important, as you can push the crap right back into the ABS unit ..big $$$ mistake.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-18-2006, 09:35 AM
I told you so!
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Motor City, MI
Posts: 2,845
I'm usually doing other stuff "while I'm there", like regreasing the wheel bearings.
__________________
95 E320 Cabriolet, 153K
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-18-2006, 07:48 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10
Thank you all for your repplies!!!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-19-2006, 03:24 AM
Bob G's Avatar
Bob G
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Long Beach ,California
Posts: 276
Are instructions for replacement of brake pads on a 1992 300-E simular or different. I want to repack the wheel bearing as well what is involved? Is synthic grease ok to use Valvoline?

Bob Geco
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12-19-2006, 04:15 AM
Battlecat714's Avatar
NEEZ FTW!
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Anaheim, CA
Posts: 339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob G View Post
Are instructions for replacement of brake pads on a 1992 300-E simular or different. I want to repack the wheel bearing as well what is involved? Is synthic grease ok to use Valvoline?

Bob Geco
I used the instructions those w124 instructions on my 92 300e...all turned out well.
__________________
1994|040|W124.036|E500
http://www.mbworld.org/forums/image....ine=1216527951
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-19-2006, 12:30 PM
I told you so!
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Motor City, MI
Posts: 2,845
Repacking the wheel bearings includes a few tricky steps. If not done properly, the bearings will have a short life.

Firstly, the grease seal must be replaced. It's nearly impossible to remove it without destroying it. Plus it's considered a wear item.

Any good wheel bearing grease (NLGI 2, with EP additive, for elevated temperature service) should work fine for the bearings. Valvoline synthetic, Mobil 1 synthetic are two good choices. I'm sure there are others. I find the best grease is Mobil Infinitec 152. This is a synthetic grease specifically made for wheel bearings, cheaper then Mobil 1, yet outperforms Mobil 1. The only problem is that I haven't yet seen it sold over-the-counter. Don't over-grease the bearings.

The most important part of wheel bearing service is proper seating and setting the preload. Seating is done by installing the bearing and wrenching down on the center nut while turning the wheel/rotor until the wheel becomes hard to turn. Then back off the center nut and set the preload, ideally with a dial gage.

Please search for more detail on greasing and setting preload. There's been much written on this subject.

__________________
95 E320 Cabriolet, 153K
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page