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  #1  
Old 01-08-2003, 06:58 PM
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How to keep parts from rusting?

I will be rebuilding my 300D engine over the next few months (another thread) and in the meantime I want to keep the rust to a minimum on the exposed parts - crank, cam, block, etc... Any good ideas to keep this stuff from rusting while it is sitting in the garage/shed? It will be under roof but in the humid environment rust still kinda develops. Right now I am just keeping a good, thick layer of grease on all of it.
tia
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  #2  
Old 01-08-2003, 08:16 PM
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Cast iron is the worst for rust.... worse than steel.

As you dismantle your engine, try moving some of the parts - like crank and cam - into the basement. Other than that, keep the parts wet with oil, grease, or whatever it takes, and try not to let the project sit too long unattended.
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  #3  
Old 01-09-2003, 12:00 AM
PaulC
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Assuming you can't find anything in an auto parts store that appeals to you, try a sporting goods store that sells rifles. Look for gun lube, grease, etc. Blued firearms love to corrode, and more than a few companies make products designed to combat this situation.

P.S. Attics are usually drier than basements. Move the light pieces upstairs.
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  #4  
Old 01-09-2003, 09:14 AM
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Thanks - I will check the gun supply store.
I'd have to dig a hole to put them in the basement .
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  #5  
Old 01-09-2003, 09:52 AM
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I'm guessing that if you spray them with used engine oil (not diesel's maybe...) they wouldn't rust at all. Just make sure to wipe them clean before reinstalling.

good luck with that engine
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  #6  
Old 01-09-2003, 10:43 AM
jcd jcd is offline
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Coat with a lubricant and wrap in Saran Wrap. Interestingly enough, the initial use of Saran Wrap was to prevent rust on guns shipped overseas during WW II. The air/moisture barrier strength of Saran Wrap is outstanding.

Make sure that you get the "original" Saran Wrap and not any of the "cling" wraps. Saran wrap is made of a distinct resin, versus most wraps which are polyethylene. From a barrier protection standpoint, Saran Wrap is a safe door and other wraps are a screen door.

BTW, I used to work for Dow, but no longer......Saran is the best stuff out there for air/moisture protection.

JCD
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  #7  
Old 01-09-2003, 10:51 AM
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Jcd has it right in my opinion.
What I've done in the past (with similar storage options) is to spray the day-lights out of everything with a rust preventative (I like LPS 2, or if you don't mind the mess LPS 3) then I cover the entire assembly with a plastic bag/s.
Thsi has worked for me, my $0.02
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Old 01-09-2003, 11:15 AM
jcd jcd is offline
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Just to reinforce. Saran Wrap.....original....is the best. Bags and most wraps are made of Polyethylene, which does not have the same air/moisture barrier properties. Saran is REALLY better.

Jim
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  #9  
Old 01-09-2003, 12:12 PM
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If it were me, I'd look go to a local shop I know that rebuilds diesel engines and axles for tractor trailers. Last time I was there, they had an amazing array of lubricants in their showroom. These guys really knew their stuff and were very helpful. Check your yellow pages -- there's probably a similar shop in your area.

Jeff Pierce
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Old 01-09-2003, 03:16 PM
evoboy
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Lightbulb

Here in the UK we have various brands of Wax based sprays.
Maybe U can find Dinitrol or Rocol in the US ?
These are translucent wax aerosol sprays intended for just the application you require. They can be removed with normal solvents, even gas if you must !
Failing that try your local Aeroparts supplier , they are always preserving parts from the elements.

L8r
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  #11  
Old 01-09-2003, 10:44 PM
zeb zeb is offline
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wd40 or chain lube should do the trick
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  #12  
Old 01-10-2003, 06:21 AM
evoboy
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Exclamation

Zeb,

We meet again !

Based on my experience WD40 is no good for long term protection and whilst chain lube will protect , it is V messy to handle and expensive.
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  #13  
Old 01-10-2003, 08:46 AM
lperei01
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Check this link for rust inhibitors (with full product description): http://www.lubeplanet.com

Also, why don't you buy an electrical dehumidifier (where I live you can buy one for approx. $200). You could have it working (automatically) say 5 hours per day. Since these appliances can actually control humidity levels it will, for sure, be useful later somewhere inside your house (that's the way I justified its acquisition to my wife, while I was really worried with humidity levels on my garage)
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