Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes ShopForum > Technical Information and Support > Tech Help

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 06-13-2003, 04:02 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Central Asia
Posts: 104
My friend in the US bought the Sear multimeter for me and now she needs to send it to me to Uzbekistan. Now I need to figure out a cheaper way for my friend to send it. I think DHL can deliver it really fast but the rates for package up to 0,5 kgs is above $50. Does anybody have an experience on importing goods?
What is cheaper?
__________________
1989 230E, 8v, 166.000 km, updated to 94/95 trunk & hood
2002 Daewoo Nexia 50.000 km
Sold:
1987 VW Jetta GLE 16V, Recaro seats
1982 Volvo 240 DL (lovely car!)
and few more american cars.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 06-13-2003, 08:10 AM
LarryBible
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Thanks for the thanks.

I actually bought another one a month or so ago. The problem is that the meter is so small and compact that I misplaced it somewhere. I expect it to turn up, so I will then have one for the toolbox that I carry in my car.

They are not only good for duty cycle, they are as handy as a pocket on a shirt and will probably fit in that pocket.

BTW, electrically measuring a thermocouple up to 1400 degrees is no problem, making a thermocouple that will live at 1400 degrees IS a problem. That's why the thermocouple they offer is only good for 500 degrees. Anything above that is to be run away from anyway.

Have a great day,
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 06-13-2003, 09:36 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: secret
Posts: 3,044
Quote:
Originally posted by Hurshi
My friend in the US bought the Sear multimeter for me and now she needs to send it to me to Uzbekistan. Now I need to figure out a cheaper way for my friend to send it. I think DHL can deliver it really fast but the rates for package up to 0,5 kgs is above $50. Does anybody have an experience on importing goods?
What is cheaper?
I'm in the shipping business and there is one thing for sure; fast = expensive. Try regular old UPS and sit back and wait.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 06-13-2003, 09:42 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: SoCal
Posts: 1,303
"In the instructions, it says that this meter will measure up to 1400 degrees F. The only thermocouples that I see in the Sears site only go to 500 deg. Am I missing something? I may want to measure my BBQ grill fire or something."

At the Cole-Parmer website you can find several models of probes, from basic to fancy, that will go to 1400F. One at just under $40 looks real nice, one at $22 is much more basic, but still immersible and food-safe. Most type-K thermocouple wire is teflon insulated (500F) and the high-temp models insulate in the probe with ceramic standoffs, SS for the sheath.

Steve
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 06-13-2003, 10:37 AM
LarryBible
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
or..... you can simply get some of the thermocouple wire in the bulk, cut the end, strip back the two wires, tin them with solder and twist together. That's all that is in a thermocouple.

When I was in college I worked in a burn in house where we put all sorts of semiconductor components in ovens. We had thermocouple instruments everywhere, but rarely used commercial thermocouples because of their expense. We just tinned the two wires and twisted them together. You don't even have to tin them, but if you don't they will corrode in the heat soon. The corrosion will then give eroneous readings.

Good luck,
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 06-13-2003, 11:27 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: S. Texas
Posts: 1,237
Hurshi,

I lived overseas in all parts of the world for 20 years. I shipped back to the States and had the States ship to me all sorts of things. All I ever used was local mail, and can't remember loosing anything. It may be a bit slow sometimes but the cost savings more than make up for the delay. Tell your friend to insure the package. That will leave a paper trail and make it easer to keep track of the package.

After recommending the US Postal Service I am sure that they will loose your package. But give it a try anyway.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 06-13-2003, 11:29 AM
thebern's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Knotts Island, NC
Posts: 382
multimeter guide

Sears has a very good manual on multimeters for ten bucks, part number 34 82303. Iagree with an earlier post that one should study the basics of electricity first.

thebern
__________________
1982 240D 313,000 (4 speed)
1984 300CD 172,483
1985 German Shepherd Dog -Lacey- R.I.P.11/04/05

Hood Stars, Wrist Crowns and Obsession Dobs
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 06-14-2003, 04:04 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Central Asia
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally posted by LarryBible
or..... you can simply get some of the thermocouple wire in the bulk, cut the end, strip back the two wires, tin them with solder and twist together. That's all that is in a thermocouple.

When I was in college I worked in a burn in house where we put all sorts of semiconductor components in ovens. We had thermocouple instruments everywhere, but rarely used commercial thermocouples because of their expense. We just tinned the two wires and twisted them together. You don't even have to tin them, but if you don't they will corrode in the heat soon. The corrosion will then give eroneous readings.

Good luck,
It sounds like a very cheap and easy thing to do.
Can you refer us to a good website that has pictures on how to make a thermocouple, please?

kip Foss,
I have decided to use local mail. I will tell my friend to insure the package and if it gets lost then I will might use express mail service.
__________________
1989 230E, 8v, 166.000 km, updated to 94/95 trunk & hood
2002 Daewoo Nexia 50.000 km
Sold:
1987 VW Jetta GLE 16V, Recaro seats
1982 Volvo 240 DL (lovely car!)
and few more american cars.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 06-14-2003, 04:23 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 645
Failures of Capitalism

I drove all the way up to Sears Aventura and they didn't have this thing. They claimed that they might have one in a couple of days.

I thought that K Mart was the only store that did that: advertise stuff that they don't have.

Then I went to Costco: more disappointment: they didn't have even ONE men's white t-shirt in the entire huge place.

What a pain!
__________________
Semibodacious Transmogrifications a Specialty

1990 300D 2.5 Turbo sedan 171K (Rudolf)
1985 300D Turbo TD Wagon 219K (Remuda)

"Time flies like and arrow, yet fruit flies like a banana"
---Marx (Groucho)
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 06-22-2003, 02:14 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: SoCal
Posts: 1,303
"or..... you can simply get some of the thermocouple wire in the bulk, cut the end, strip back the two wires, tin them with solder and twist together. That's all that is in a thermocouple."

Just a caution about this. Since TFE materials are usually used in the insulation of type-K thermocouple wire, there is a possibility of toxic vapors if used at the upper end of the 1400F range of the meter. Semiconductor testing would never occur near the 500F vaporization temp of the TFE, so this method is very common. For higher temps, the cable is stripped way back, and a ceramic insulator is used to keep the wires separated up to the tip weld. This is what you will find inside the high-temp probes. This information would only be significant if you were to do any monitoring of, say, manifold temps - or the cat.

Steve
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 06-30-2003, 11:00 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Florida / N.H.
Posts: 8,777
Meter info for anyone owning one:

We purchased two of these meters and found the same fault with both..

The condition is cont buzzer intermittant and ohms zero float..
Found the fault to be the lead post securing screws on the board [three small phillips] to be loose, causing poor contact..
Oddly enough, both were the center [ neg/com. ] post..
Do secure them, but do not over tighten...

If your cont buzzer is not steady and/or erratic, take a look at this connection...simple test is to connect leads together and go to cont. buzzer and jiggle the leads at the post ends.. you will hear it through the piezo....looking for steady tone if good connection.
Otherwise, fine product for the $$$$..

Maybe we got the Coffee Break run...

Last edited by Arthur Dalton; 06-30-2003 at 11:05 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 06-30-2003, 04:06 PM
Benzwood's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 300
Meter recommendations and maintenance tips, gotta love this forum! All three post screws on mine were a little less snug than I thought they should be. Got the torque wrench out and took care of it.

By the way, I was also getting a flakey connection before I realized that you have to really shove on the leads when you stick them in the multimeter. It feels like you have them in with only 1/4" or so insertion -- and they do make electrical contact -- but if you shove on them they actually go in so that they are nearly flush. I may be the only dummy that didn't know this, but thought I'd mention it just in case someone else didn't. A great improvement over my old el-cheapo multimeter as far as positive contact.

I'm curious while I had the cover off... what's the purpose of the little metallic sticker and plastic assembly on the back cover that is contacted by the little spring thing on the circuit board?

I'm curious because like a typical meddling Benz owner I was going to "mod" my meter by sticking the spare fuses in the extra space below the battery compartment that's just begging for them (see photo for where they'd fit, secured in their little Ziploc bag w/some double-sided tape maybe). Otherwise I'm certain to not have the fuse when I need it. Probably after some other typical meddling and sparks flying.

But that plastic/metal thing has the appearance of some importance (wild guess is a capacitance calibration thing?) and I'm wondering if putting something in proximity to it would screw up its function.
Attached Thumbnails
Our favorite multimeter is on sale-multimeter.jpg  
__________________
1992 300E
1995 E320
1999 E320 Wagon

Last edited by Benzwood; 06-30-2003 at 05:36 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 06-30-2003, 04:38 PM
Benzwood's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 300
Still curious about the function of that metal/plastic thing, but I solved my modding problem more elegantly...

The access compartment that each fuse is in is deep enough to accommodate another fuse in each.

To insulate, I put the spare fuse inside some 3/16" shrink tubing, which I cut slightly too long for the access compartment so that is wedged in when inserted (no rattling).

See photo (license plate number obscured to foil criminals) showing spare fuse installed on left side. Life is good.

Now as long as the fuse doesn't get so hot when it blows that it heat-shrinks the tubing on my spare, hehe.

MULTIMOD Kits available now for $14.95*, act fast, quantities are limited!



* Plus shipping. AMG logo $50 additional.
Attached Thumbnails
Our favorite multimeter is on sale-multimeter2.jpg  
__________________
1992 300E
1995 E320
1999 E320 Wagon

Last edited by Benzwood; 06-30-2003 at 04:59 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 06-30-2003, 05:46 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Florida / N.H.
Posts: 8,777
Yeah , all my better meters have spare fuse compartments..
I tried the piggy -back like you mention, but found the lack of clearance may put tension on the board..
There is a perfect place in the rubber holster.. take it off and you will see some ribs in the bottom of the mold...the fuse spares fit here perfectly....slip them in the rib cavities and pop the case back on...

Last edited by Arthur Dalton; 06-30-2003 at 05:52 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 06-30-2003, 09:58 PM
Benzwood's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 300
Are you trying to kill sales of my MULTIMOD(tm) business? I'll sue!!

Actually there is plenty of space above the installed fuses... that's the reason for me cutting the tubing a little long, otherwise the fuse could rattle around.

I did actually try putting them in the rubber case before that, but they don't fit without expanding the rubber a bit, and the tight fight would reduce the carefully engineered (I'm sure ) shock absorption abilities of the rubber case, and/or causing the spare fuse(s) to shatter if the meter is dropped.

Not to mention if you forget they are there and take the rubber case off to change the batteries, they could flip out onto the garage floor and shatter or roll behind a storage shelf into the land of dust bunnies. Hah!

Ah... the phone is ringing again...


MULTIMOD(tm) Sales Projections
__________________
1992 300E
1995 E320
1999 E320 Wagon
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2011 Pelican Parts - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page