Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes ShopForum > Technical Information and Support > Tech Help

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 09-12-2003, 10:09 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Falls Church, VA
Posts: 5,316
Ditto. Great wrench! I am going to post it on the Ritter-Easley board with proper attribution, of course.

BTW - I have the impact type pin puller if you need it. I'm about 5 miles west of the District.
__________________
Chuck Taylor
Falls Church VA
'66 200, '66 230SL, '96 SL500. Sold: '81 380SL, '86 300E, '72 250C, '95 C220, 3 '84 280SL's '90 420SEL, '72 280SE, '73 280C, '78 280SE, '70 280SL, '77 450SL, '85 380SL, '87 560SL, '85 380SL, '72 350SL, '96 S500 Coupe
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 09-12-2003, 10:39 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Washington, D.C.
Posts: 395
I'm still full of myself for having come up with that one.

Thanks, Morris!
__________________
Henry Bofinger
1989 560 SEL (black/black)
2001 Audi TT Roadster (silver/grey)
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 09-12-2003, 10:48 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Washington, D.C.
Posts: 395
CTaylor738 -

Thanks for the offer - I'd like to pick you up on that one. You can email me at hbofinger@earthlink.net

Really appreciate it!
__________________
Henry Bofinger
1989 560 SEL (black/black)
2001 Audi TT Roadster (silver/grey)
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 09-12-2003, 11:22 AM
MrCjames's Avatar
California Dreaming
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 599
Congrats on overcoming the biggest challenge with hardware, seizure!!!

Here are a couple of suggestions from my belt of experience with that particular bolt. Use a brass drift (1/2" or larger), place it on the head of the bolt and give it two good blows with a 2.5lb hammer. I use a wrench to see if I can feel the immediate give from the static tension on the bolt. Tighten the bolt just until you feel it give, than try loosening it. You will know if it is going to break free or not.

If the bolt does not break free spray it with Wurth Rost Off than drive the car for a couple of days, than give it another try. If it feels like it is not ready to turn clear the timing cover area from any material that could ignite or catch fire. Use either a propane torch or the handy butane crack pipe torch and while KEEPING AN EYE ON THE FLAME heat the threaded boss area of the timing cover. After 3 to 5 minutes of heating spray it again with Rost Off, tighten first than loosen.

This technique has worked well for me, maybe it will work well for others.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 09-12-2003, 10:19 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 3,469
I would HIGHLY recommend getting a new bolt.

I am suprised you didnt shatter the bolt making it really cold like that. Steel doesnt do as well when it is cold vs aluminum. I was sitting in on my friends Mechanics of Materials class last semester and the teacher was explaining how steel is very brittle at lower temperatures, and aluminum has a broader range of where it is flexable, similarly that is why airplanes use a lot of aluminum because they operate in very cold temperatures as well as very hot temperatures (-60 to 60 C or so).

But heed the advice on getting a new bolt.
__________________
No Benzes in the stable at the moment, but itching for one again.

Former Mercedes in the Stable:
1983 300CD Turbo diesel 515k mi sold
1984 300CD Turbo Diesel 150 k mi sold
1982 300D Turbo Diesel 225 sold
1987 300D Turbo Diesel 255k mi sold
1988 300 CE AMG Hammer 15k mi sold
1986 300E Amg Hammer 88k mi sold
1992 500E 156k mi sold
etc.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 09-12-2003, 11:05 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Washington, D.C.
Posts: 395
Obviously I never intended to save the bolt - just to get it out. Not just because of strength, but also because of the shape of the head after trying to get it out before!

No - it would not shatter (no room for it to - it would shrink, just as it did). But I do recommend that the coolant be aimed directly at the bolt, and not hit the rest of the block!

By the way, being a pilot myself, I have never seen a prop held in place by aluminum bolts! (I'm not kidding - there is a fictional joke out there about a prop having been attached with fitting bolts from a bicycle shop, and the prop deciding to do a solo away from the airplane at altitude!)
__________________
Henry Bofinger
1989 560 SEL (black/black)
2001 Audi TT Roadster (silver/grey)
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 09-12-2003, 11:20 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 3,469
Well, when steel gets cold it can shatter.

Im not talking about C182s or anything, Im talking about commercial aircraft that fly very high, transatlantic flights.
__________________
No Benzes in the stable at the moment, but itching for one again.

Former Mercedes in the Stable:
1983 300CD Turbo diesel 515k mi sold
1984 300CD Turbo Diesel 150 k mi sold
1982 300D Turbo Diesel 225 sold
1987 300D Turbo Diesel 255k mi sold
1988 300 CE AMG Hammer 15k mi sold
1986 300E Amg Hammer 88k mi sold
1992 500E 156k mi sold
etc.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 09-13-2003, 04:32 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: oregon
Posts: 2,013
breaking bolts and plenty of other stuff do to the weakining of steel from intense cold while Repairing equiptment during the building of the pipeline in Alaska was very common.I broke the dis. bolt on my 500SE while doing chain replacement ,I drilled it out,retaped it then put in a stud with red locktite.........
William Rogers......
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 09-13-2003, 09:58 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Washington, D.C.
Posts: 395
What I am saying is that I got the bolt out in 20 minutes using this technique. It did not break, but had I not chilled it, I probably would have broken it and had to drill it out. So I saved myself a ton of time.

There are many factors that go into this. Don't forget that as you remove the bolt, once it has unfrozen, the tension is actually released. The idea is to nudge it to the point so it actually turns.

I never re-use a bolt that has given me trouble, for many reasons (even if the head seems ok after pulling it).

Now - for the final issue on the aircraft thing, and so we can lay it to rest - I am sure that the pressurized fuselage of the Cessna 340a I flew last month has aluminium bolts (and rivets) that expand and contract at the same rate as the skin itself while climbing to 30,000 feet and going through the pressurization cycle. I am also sure that the PROPS are NOT held in place by aluminum bolts....
__________________
Henry Bofinger
1989 560 SEL (black/black)
2001 Audi TT Roadster (silver/grey)

Last edited by hbofinger; 09-14-2003 at 01:06 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 09-17-2003, 04:25 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Washington, D.C.
Posts: 395
No longer full of myself!

Today I was at a the American Service Center in Alexandria, Virginia, getting some parts. This is a purely Mercedes place. I mentioned my frozen bolt technique to the parts person there.

He looked at me and said "You want to know what they do here? They use this stuff..." and he pulled out a can of Wurth Rost Off (I never heard of it before). "They swear by it."

Lo and behold - this stuff is the chiller and the penetrating oil combined! It's basically the same technique - it chills the bolt to -40 degrees Farenheit (not celsius), creating cracks in the bind.

So the good news is that what I did is fine and actually common practice among pros, the bad news is I was not the first one who came up with it!

Here is a link to the product...

http://www.properautocare.com/wuroofficea.html
__________________
Henry Bofinger
1989 560 SEL (black/black)
2001 Audi TT Roadster (silver/grey)

Last edited by hbofinger; 10-28-2003 at 11:08 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2011 Pelican Parts - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page