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  #1  
Old 12-25-2007, 05:53 PM
Randall Kress
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Bleeding Red on Christmas Day...

So, I had the time and inclination to take out my trusted 300D. Upon checking everything over, then firing up the engine, I noticed red fluid leaking, squirting from the transmission cooler return line, the flex line that goes into the radiator.

It's leaking where the tube goes through the support, through the bracket connected to the oil pan?

So, now I have a dilemma. The nearest shop is 20 miles away.

Do I call a flatbed? Or do I try to temporarily patch the line, and drive it over?

What to do?

What I think/know happened, the rubber grommet that holds the line wore away, causing the metal bracket to wear-away the line...

Now my car is stuck...

Any advice would be much appreciated... Merry Christmas!

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  #2  
Old 12-25-2007, 05:59 PM
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Fix it. Order two new transmission cooler lines, drain your tranny fluid, remove the lines ( atf oil will pour from there also) put the new ones on fill it up and go. Its really simple. Dont patch it, if it breaks while your driving id imagine it could be catastrophic. Theyre easy to replace, anyone can do it.
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  #3  
Old 12-25-2007, 06:09 PM
Randall Kress
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But...

The car is sitting in a parking spot behind my apartment. Do I need to jack the car up to access the lines for replacement?

Any special tools?

Thanks for the advise!
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  #4  
Old 12-25-2007, 06:13 PM
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The damage is to the hard lines

If the leak is acutally where described, (clamps at the oil pan) then the leak is in the hard line, not the flexible line. You need a new hard line, and two new aluminum crush washers. I bought a new hard line (dealer item) for about $70 12 months ago.

Not a hard job, but more involved than just changing the flexible lines.

Yes, the car will need to be raised to do the hard lines.....
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  #5  
Old 12-25-2007, 06:24 PM
Craig
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Yes you do need to replace the hard lines, but you can temporarily patch it until the correct hard lines show up (dealer item, it took mine about a week to get there).

Order the hard line, the washers for the banjo fittings on the transmission, and a set of new grommets for those little brackets (it's very cheap, the whole thing should be less than $100). In the mean time you can cut out the damaged section of tubing (tubing cutter) and insert a short section of hose with a couple of clamps. I did that for a couple of weeks without any problems.

I know it's a giant hack, but it should hold together for a while if you need to use the car while waiting for the parts. However, I was more relaxed once I fixed mine correctly.
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  #6  
Old 12-25-2007, 06:44 PM
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Answer:

If it is the steel tube?
* Cut out the damaged section, and replace it with a compression fitting.
Note: The fitting may last for three - ten years.
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  #7  
Old 12-25-2007, 07:26 PM
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* Randall, I'm hearing that neither money nor time are a problem. Nor is it the case that you need this car daily. Fix it right. If you have the talent, tools, and facility, get the new steel line. Don't forget to get the rubber/plastic liners that fit inside the special line brackets. Sounds like that's ultimately what caused the metal-to-metal abrasion that wore a hole in your line. The rubber liner for that bracket/clamp dries out and crumbles away, leaving a loose metal-to-metal condition.
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  #8  
Old 12-25-2007, 08:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Squires View Post
* Randall, I'm hearing that neither money nor time are a problem. Nor is it the case that you need this car daily. Fix it right. If you have the talent, tools, and facility, get the new steel line. Don't forget to get the rubber/plastic liners that fit inside the special line brackets. Sounds like that's ultimately what caused the metal-to-metal abrasion that wore a hole in your line. The rubber liner for that bracket/clamp dries out and crumbles away, leaving a loose metal-to-metal condition.
I think the compression fitting is a great idea. Even if you just do that until you can replace the lines. If it is outside, I would rather put a compression fitting on it and bring it inside to work on it.
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  #9  
Old 12-25-2007, 08:34 PM
Craig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bio300TDTdriver View Post
I think the compression fitting is a great idea. Even if you just do that until you can replace the lines. If it is outside, I would rather put a compression fitting on it and bring it inside to work on it.
I think the rubber hose band-aid is quicker, I did that pretty quickly when mine started leaking. I used on if those little "home depot" tubing cutters and a 2-3" length of whatever size rubber hose. Fixing it correctly took me about an hour with the car on ramps, I had to loosen one of the exhaust hangers to snake the new tube into position. Hint, clean the bottom of the engine first.
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  #10  
Old 12-25-2007, 08:51 PM
Randall Kress
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Thanks guys...

Thanks for all your recommendations, however, I'm going to have to call a flat bed...

I don't have the access underneath the car, to safely do it...

But what's a compression fitting?

Thanks for all your Christmas support... I wonder if AAA will tow the car?

I'll have to call.

-All the best,

Randy
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  #11  
Old 12-25-2007, 09:05 PM
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My vote is for the rubber band-aid. That will patch it well enough to get it to the mechanic or in the garage where you can more comfortably replace it.

If you do tow the car, use a flatbed or tow with the back wheels off the ground (most hook tow trucks have dollies specifically for that).
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  #12  
Old 12-27-2007, 12:39 AM
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If you are doing the line on the right side, you will have to remove the
trans dip stick tube to access the banjo bolt on the transmission.

there is a bolt at the trans, I think 4mm allen. and a bolt on the intake
manifold. 10mm?

If you do remove the dipstick tube, replace the rubber O ring.

Charlie
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  #13  
Old 12-27-2007, 01:23 AM
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If you just need to get the car to the shop, you should be able to fabricate a temporary patch with a piece of rubber hose and a hose clamp or two. Just remove the offending bracket. Then slit a piece of 5/16" fuel hose lengthwise, put it on the line, then put a hose clamp or two right over hole causing the leak.

That's almost guaranteed to stop or slow the leak enough to get you to the shop. (Even if you had to add a couple quarts of ATF along the way, it would be way cheaper than a tow truck.)

Or, if the leak is in the return line, you could put a plug in one of the flex lines and stop the flow that way.

Last edited by tangofox007; 12-27-2007 at 01:30 AM.
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  #14  
Old 12-27-2007, 10:34 AM
Craig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charmalu View Post
If you are doing the line on the right side, you will have to remove the trans dip stick tube to access the banjo bolt on the transmission.
Not on mine.

I would also patch it and drive it to the shop if I didn't want to do it myself.
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  #15  
Old 12-28-2007, 12:55 PM
Randall Kress
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Thanks...

Thanks guys for all your advice. I called AAA and they towed the gal to the shop.

It's getting fixed, and I'm less of a panic.

Now what they'll once its done, is another story!

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