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  #1  
Old 01-13-2005, 05:33 PM
Breckman99's Avatar
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Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 541
Block heater! - Not the usual story....

Hello all,
I was poking around under the hood of the 83 today and found that I actually DO have a block heater installed! I went through my shelves of Benz parts (mostly old - don't get excited now, these are my backup parts so nothing is for sale!) and found a block heater cord. I plugged it all in and waited for that signature hiss..... Nothing! I pulled the cord and looked at the contacts on the heater - one is completely broken off..... DANG! So what do you think of this one eh? Is it easier to remove a stock block heater than that infernal plug? The original engine did not have one and I attempted to get the plug out with my limited technology (no lift or pit at the time). The engine that is in the car was used, so I assume they just ripped the cords out without care and snapped the post off.
Main questions:
What is the size of that thing? I want to finally have the stock heater like my 79 had! I have tried all types of different heaters on this car over the years and none have compared to that little stock one. My plan is to get the stock heater working, add tranny, oil sump, and battery heaters to the car so I will be prepared to ship anywhere in the world. My friend was sent to AK, he ended up selling his car and buying a gasser dodge P/U that still isn't starting without being plugged in! I do not want this to happen to me!
Let me know what your thoughts are. I do not need to hear about all the different stick on, magnetic, in hose heaters out there, I have thrown almost every different type of heater on her (lots of good block heaters on wrecked cars around here - sorry but requests will be denied - all free time is devoted to the PROJECT) in different locations around the engine and they help, but not to the extent of being like a warm start.

I do have one more request for information, this time for the BIO folks.
I plan on running a separate HEATED tank in the trunk, with the supply and return lines running IN the cooling hoses to keep the fuel hot on its journey to the IP. Has anyone out there done this? Is there a good quality CIRCULATING "block heater" that I could tie into this coolant circuit to Pre-heat the tank in extreme circumstances? Any information on custom fittings built for this application would be greatly appreciated. ESPICALLY if anybody knows of a fitting that will allow the fuel lines to exit the cooling hose without restricting flow, preferably of a compatible metal or alloy to those metals used in the engine and radiator. Definitely do not need any early corrosion, and no rubber, plastic ect. will keep me from worrying about coolant/fuel mixing

Anyway, after all this heat talk I am thinking of the power cord required to run all that junk -- and to stay flexible at subzero temperatures --- I don't even want to think about how much that will cost.....

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1983 Mercedes 300SD
1987 Mercedes 300SDL
2001 VW Passat 2.8 AWD
2007 OM642 Jeep WK 4x4

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Old 01-13-2005, 05:37 PM
Breckman99's Avatar
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Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 541
Whoops!!! - Ment to post this in the Diesel section - if the mod sees this will you please move it? Thank you,
William
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1987 Mercedes 300SDL
2001 VW Passat 2.8 AWD
2007 OM642 Jeep WK 4x4

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Old 01-13-2005, 09:29 PM
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Speaking of pits, when the wife and I were house hunting a few years ago we looked at a fixer upper that didn't do a whole lot for us. Until I looked in the garage. It had a pit. An honest to goodness 5 foot freaking pit in the garage.

It's amazing how a hole in a floor will make you reevaluate an entire house.
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Old 01-13-2005, 10:04 PM
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Did'ja buy it?
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Old 01-13-2005, 10:05 PM
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Mmm.... Diesel.
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: N. NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by koop
Speaking of pits, when the wife and I were house hunting a few years ago we looked at a fixer upper that didn't do a whole lot for us. Until I looked in the garage. It had a pit. An honest to goodness 5 foot freaking pit in the garage.

It's amazing how a hole in a floor will make you reevaluate an entire house.
That's great! Biggest laugh to myself I'd had all day. Wife food shopping and kids in bed.
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Old 01-14-2005, 01:13 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Centennial, Colorado
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by koop

It's amazing how a hole in a floor will make you reevaluate an entire house.
I've seen some really bad houses, but never one with a PIT in the garage. What were they doing -- digging for pirate gold? Searching for Jimmy Hoffa?

I did have a good friend tell me that once, when he was househunting in the Washington, D.C. area, he came across one with a fully-equipped dungeon. The sexual type. I guess for some people, that could have been a selling point, because the owners weren't hiding it.

-- Bokonon
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  #7  
Old 01-14-2005, 02:25 AM
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Didn't buy it, but there was no doubt about it, it was pit. Had four steps or so and was formed concrete. Very cool.
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  #8  
Old 01-14-2005, 03:52 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Wisconsin
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[QUOTE=Breckman99]Is it easier to remove a stock block heater than that infernal plug?

Funny -- I had my W123 300td plugged in the other week and heard a pop that kind of reminded me of a coffemaker dying. No more heat, and three months of Wisconsin winter to look forward to. Soooo...

I would say yes, the block heater is fairly easy to change vs. the block plug, probably on a par with a starter replacement vs. a swap of the oil cooler lines. I pulled the right outer tie rod to make some space for the 20-inch breaker bar, working from below with the front wheels on ramps. It came out with a modicum of grunting and groaning. (I'm 6-1, 230, but the long wrench made it pretty easy to get it started. Get a cheap one at Harbor Freight if you have to.)

I'd suggest a little sealant on the threads when you install the replacement.


Russ M
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  #9  
Old 01-21-2005, 12:33 AM
Breckman99's Avatar
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Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 541
Thats what I needed to know THANKS!

I used to have a pit in my old house - definatley a feature I will consider installing in my next house, either that or a lift. I couldn't believe how much I missed that thing when I moved, made having a look under the car just easy or easier than working from the top!

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