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  #1  
Old 10-26-2002, 09:12 AM
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Location: Trenton, NJ
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T-Chain Guide Pins - What Tool?

Sorry to bug everyone again. I've been back through the various detailed descriptions of T-chain and guide replacement by Mike Tangas and others and came up with one other question...what tool is needed to remove the pins that hold the guides in place? Are there any special considerations that I'll need to be aware of given the possible size change in pins (several parts sources indicate new and old pin sizes)?

Upps - that was two questions.

Thanks
jlc
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'87 560SEL 267K (177K on motor) Blue/Blue
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  #2  
Old 10-26-2002, 01:30 PM
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When I did the chain and rails on my wife`s car (190e), I recall the pins being a bit of a pain to remove. If you had some sort of slide hammer you could grip the pins with, that would be the best way to go. On her car they were a pressed (tight) fit. (I had to replace one because the guide had shattered and the chain cut partially through the pin!) I ended up getting a grip on it with a big pair of vice grips and using a carefully placed J shaped pry bar underneath to pry up. It worked. The replacement pin came in one length, so I had to cut to the length I needed.

Good luck.

Tinker
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  #3  
Old 10-26-2002, 01:38 PM
Gympie
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Is this the tool you need?
http://toolsource.com:888/ost/product.asp?sourceid=http%3A%2F%2Ftoolsource%2Ecom%3A888%2Fost%2Fhazet%2Fdefault%2Easp%253fdept%255f id%3D500%2526mscssid%3Ddbhepbcatms92pnd00j74979av0fam5b%2526sourceid%3D%2526brand%5Fid%3D&dept%5Fid=500&pf%5Fid=77464&mscssid=EDHEPBCATMS92PND00J74979A5T2EW8B

OnTool had one also. Went to their site and they went belly-up. To bad, as it was a great place to buy tools online.
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  #4  
Old 10-26-2002, 02:39 PM
LarryBible
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There are several commercially available tools, but all you need is a bolt that will thread into the pin and nut a few sizes larger with a washer. Put the bolt through the washer, then the nut, then thread it into the pin. Tighten the nut and the pin will come out.

You may have to experiment with a stack of washers or different length bolts. This works just as good as my fifty dollar tool.

Good luck,
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  #5  
Old 10-26-2002, 04:06 PM
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Location: Cape Cod Massachusetts
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Tools?

Ditto on Larry's method, sometimes an appropriate sized socket using a longer bolt/nut/washers through it, will work well also.

But if you want/need the properly designed tool most of the euro tool dealers have it, but I have recently done some business with a small independent tool maker that produces his own copy of the MB tool. This tool was recently auctioned on ebay (albeit without takers, asking $60, you might call him and make an offer, the shipping is included in the price) take a look here:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1866013083

The guys name is Bill Barychko his number is 1-954-752-3701 or 1-954-216-6495 email is Barychko@att.net, his business is called Concentric Machine and he has worked on and around MBs for some time. I recently purchased his adaptation of the MB Nylon Trim Removal Wedge Tool

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1866016368

(Bill's version includes three sizes sold together as a set) that I'm very happy with the workmanship and the way he does his business. I have no interest other than being a satisfied customer.
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  #6  
Old 10-27-2002, 08:27 AM
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Scroll down about 1/2 way on this thread and there is a pic of a homemade "tool".

Bearing pin removal on E320 chain guide
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  #7  
Old 10-27-2002, 12:53 PM
Gympie
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Interesting homemade tool. But reading down in the postings, it doesn't seem like it worked too well. Wonder what he ended-up using to get it out? Called Assenmacher yesterday about their tool, as I'm going to do the same job soon. The previous design was too long to fit into tight spaces, but the new design which is sold online does a better job at popping the suckers out.

If I had a wish for mercedeshop.com it would be a tool exchange forum. How many times have we bought tools which would be only used once in a blue moon?
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  #8  
Old 10-27-2002, 01:44 PM
LarryBible
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When using a shopmade tool or my method, ensure that you thread fully into the pin to prevent problems.

As far as the tool exchange program goes, I've already tried that with disappointing results. Almost a year ago I UPS'd a tool that cost over $100 to someone that was a frequent poster on MShop. He has since stopped posting and I have yet to see my tool returned.

I also have loaned out a meter, but that was someone in my home area that I know reasonably well. I am sure I will get that one back.

Have a great day,
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  #9  
Old 10-27-2002, 02:09 PM
Gympie
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Was thinking about that problem. How about a Pay-Pal advance before sending the tool for loan in the amount of the tool. Then when returned a credit would be given to the user. But then I guess the sender would have to be trusted.
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  #10  
Old 10-27-2002, 07:37 PM
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I think my problem was that I did not have the "treaded" rod bottomed out in the internal threads of the pin before I tried to pull it out. It is important that you tighten the threaded rod (or the tool) all the way down in there before trying the pull.
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  #11  
Old 10-28-2002, 12:44 PM
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Thanks for all the suggestions everyone.

I like the idea of using an appropriate bolt with a collection of nuts and washers. Does anyone know what the threads are inside the pin(s)?

Thanks
jlc
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Jeff

'87 560SEL 267K (177K on motor) Blue/Blue
'98 Buick LeSebre 60K (wife's car)
'56 Imperial Sedan 124K
Past Cars:
'67 Dodge Monaco 130K (Sold)
'87 Chrysler 5th Ave 245K and going strong (sold)
'73 Plymouth Satillite 175K (sold)
'96 Chrysler LHS 80K (totaled)
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  #12  
Old 10-28-2002, 01:31 PM
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You need a 6 x 50 bolt.
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  #13  
Old 10-29-2002, 10:33 AM
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Mike,

Thanks yet again...I've added it to my Home Depot shopping list (assuming that they'll have it) otherwise it's off to the local obscure hardware store or autoparts place.

jlc
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Jeff

'87 560SEL 267K (177K on motor) Blue/Blue
'98 Buick LeSebre 60K (wife's car)
'56 Imperial Sedan 124K
Past Cars:
'67 Dodge Monaco 130K (Sold)
'87 Chrysler 5th Ave 245K and going strong (sold)
'73 Plymouth Satillite 175K (sold)
'96 Chrysler LHS 80K (totaled)
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  #14  
Old 10-29-2002, 11:23 AM
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Not being a MB trained mechanic, but using my skills this is how I have done it. I used a crow bar and a bolt. Sometimes I needed a spacer block under the knee of the crowbar as the pin came out. Worked great. No pounding required and it works with the engine in the car.
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T-Chain Guide Pins - What Tool?-pin-pull.jpg  
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  #15  
Old 10-29-2002, 11:37 AM
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I can't remember for sure right at the moment, but I think the bolts for the fan to water pump flange are 6 x 50. I remember using them to install the pins on reassembly as I didn't want to tap on the pin directly.
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'73 280SEL 4.5 (9/72)- RIP
Only 8,173 units built from 5/71 thru 11/72

'02 CLK320 Cabriolet - wifey's mid-life crisis

2012 VW Jetta Sportwagon TDI...at least its a diesel

Non illegitemae carborundum.
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