Parts Catalog Accessories Catalog How To Articles Tech Forums
Call Pelican Parts at 888-280-7799
Shopping Cart Cart | Project List | Order Status | Help




Go Back   PeachParts Mercedes-Benz Forum > Mercedes-Benz Tech Information and Support > Diesel Discussion

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 09-01-2010, 03:15 PM
compress ignite's Avatar
Drone aspiring to Serfdom
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: 32(degrees) North by 81(degrees) West
Posts: 5,554
'Cause...(Wait for It)

It's a German/Deutschland Startekinfo Link.

(They've probably got ALL Kinds of neat helpful info we never are allowed to access)
__________________
'84 300SD sold
124.128
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 09-01-2010, 03:28 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Cape Cod Massachusetts
Posts: 1,427
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebird View Post
I was not able to connect to the above link.
I fixed the link in was incomplete, should work now to a picture of the tool and it being used, good luck!

Last edited by Billybob; 09-01-2010 at 04:57 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 09-01-2010, 03:31 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Cape Cod Massachusetts
Posts: 1,427
Quote:
Originally Posted by compress ignite View Post
It's a German/Deutschland Startekinfo Link.

(They've probably got ALL Kinds of neat helpful info we never are allowed to access)
I don't know about that! But here's a link to the tool info site that's available and where you can start a search regarding an MB factory designated tool:


http://www.startekinfo.de/etools/
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 09-01-2010, 04:45 PM
4x4_Welder's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Poulsbo, WA
Posts: 504
That looks like a really expensive tool to do a nearly once in a lifetime job.
Might be better off finding a large socket that fits, or even just use the old seal. As has been suggested, lining it up by eye works pretty well too.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 09-17-2010, 04:00 PM
Stretch's Avatar
Gettin' outa chokey
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Between a rock and a hard place (Back in Holland at the moment)
Posts: 13,986
UPDATE:-

I've not seen this information on this forum before (disclaimer:- but that doesn't necessarily mean it isn't here) so I thought I'd add the thoughts of this engine builder I've pumping for information.

This is regarding the rear crankshaft seal NOT THE FRONT ONE but nevertheless may be of interest to some...

According to this guy if the REAR crankshaft seal is incorrectly fitted a lot of heat can get build up that can speed the failure of the main bearing closest to the REAR crankshaft seal.

For rebuilding my engine (that I'm now about to embark upon) I have been told to carry out the following procedure for fitting a rear crankshaft seal.

1) Before you start with the seal - fit the crankshaft and tighten the mounts (make 'em tight but don't go as far as torquing them) and make sure that the crankshaft spins freely. Remove crankshaft and remember how freely it span.

2) Once you are ready to fit the seal - lubricate and place a new seal in block and do the "usual" trick with a hammer handle to gently push the seal into position

3) Cut the ends slightly proud and then with a punch tap these ends flush

4) Now refit the crankshaft - torque as specified - and make sure that that it spins as freely as before.

5) Repeat the necessary steps above to make sure that the rear crankshaft seal on the upper oil pan isn't restrictive.

It seems like a good plan to me. Anyone got any comments?
__________________
1992 W201 190E 1.8 171,000 km - Daily driver
1981 W123 300D ~ 100,000 miles / 160,000 km - project car stripped to the bone
1965 Land Rover Series 2a Station Wagon CIS recovery therapy!

Don't leave that there - I'll take it to bits!

Last edited by Stretch; 09-17-2010 at 04:02 PM. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 09-17-2010, 04:22 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Cape Cod Massachusetts
Posts: 1,427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Army View Post
UPDATE:-

I've not seen this information on this forum before (disclaimer:- but that doesn't necessarily mean it isn't here) so I thought I'd add the thoughts of this engine builder I've pumping for information.

This is regarding the rear crankshaft seal NOT THE FRONT ONE but nevertheless may be of interest to some...

According to this guy if the REAR crankshaft seal is incorrectly fitted a lot of heat can get build up that can speed the failure of the main bearing closest to the REAR crankshaft seal.

For rebuilding my engine (that I'm now about to embark upon) I have been told to carry out the following procedure for fitting a rear crankshaft seal.

1) Before you start with the seal - fit the crankshaft and tighten the mounts (make 'em tight but don't go as far as torquing them) and make sure that the crankshaft spins freely. Remove crankshaft and remember how freely it span.

2) Once you are ready to fit the seal - lubricate and place a new seal in block and do the "usual" trick with a hammer handle to gently push the seal into position

3) Cut the ends slightly proud and then with a punch tap these ends flush

4) Now refit the crankshaft - torque as specified - and make sure that that it spins as freely as before.

5) Repeat the necessary steps above to make sure that the rear crankshaft seal on the upper oil pan isn't restrictive.

It seems like a good plan to me. Anyone got any comments?
So the plan is to fit things together without torquing to spec, observe and "remember" something, then install something that inparts friction, torque things to spec, then observe and compare to a "remembered" prior observation of something under different circumstances? And if not reconciled, repeating that procedure until you've convinced yourself things are correct!?

I suspect the heating bearing damage to be complete BS, and I'd follow the FSM rather than someone who came up with that. MB engineers are not perfect but you've got to give them some credit where credit is due and assume that they at bthe very least have considered the obvious when designing these systems and maintaining them.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 09-18-2010, 04:35 AM
Stretch's Avatar
Gettin' outa chokey
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Between a rock and a hard place (Back in Holland at the moment)
Posts: 13,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billybob View Post
So the plan is to fit things together without torquing to spec, observe and "remember" something, then install something that inparts friction, torque things to spec, then observe and compare to a "remembered" prior observation of something under different circumstances? And if not reconciled, repeating that procedure until you've convinced yourself things are correct!?

I suspect the heating bearing damage to be complete BS, and I'd follow the FSM rather than someone who came up with that. MB engineers are not perfect but you've got to give them some credit where credit is due and assume that they at bthe very least have considered the obvious when designing these systems and maintaining them.
Hmm you have a point with regards to the FSM that is always the safest way to go. However, sometimes you come across someone who obviously has a lot of experience and seems to be as honest as the day is long who - in albeit a long winded way - tells you to be extra careful about fitting a certain part... it kind of makes you think. Doesn't it?

Has anyone ever stumbled upon this sort of main bearing overheating problem before?
__________________
1992 W201 190E 1.8 171,000 km - Daily driver
1981 W123 300D ~ 100,000 miles / 160,000 km - project car stripped to the bone
1965 Land Rover Series 2a Station Wagon CIS recovery therapy!

Don't leave that there - I'll take it to bits!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2018 Pelican Parts, LLC - Posts may be archived for display on the Peach Parts or Pelican Parts Website -    DMCA Registered Agent Contact Page