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  #1  
Old 09-17-2001, 11:03 PM
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How to change rear brake pads

Can somebody tell me on how to change the rear brake pads of my 93' 190e 2.6.Is this the same as the front?.I read the DIY article on changing the front pads, Is it the same procedures when changing the rear? can you give some tips and precautions coz i don't want to mess it up.

Thank you.
Ronald
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  #2  
Old 09-18-2001, 01:34 AM
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Ronald,

The rear brakes are even simplier than the front brakes. All you need to do is knock out those two pins, and remove the pads and the spring. Once those pads are out, take a flat-head and push those calipers back so that you can fit in the newer, thicker pads. Insert the pad, and then the spring and re-insert the pins, and off you go! Pump the brakes a few times and you outta be on your way for endless more miles!


Good luck!

Vu
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Old 09-18-2001, 07:46 AM
LarryBible
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IT IS IMPORTANT that once you remove the pins and the spring that you remove and replace the pads ONE AT A TIME. Pull one pad out, push the piston for that pad in, put in that pad, then do the same for the other pad. If you pull both pads out, then push in one of the pistons, you can cause the other piston to force out so far that it folds the seal and will require caliper removal and rebuilding or replacing.

Good luck,
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  #4  
Old 09-18-2001, 08:03 AM
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When pushing the pistons back in, it is easier to crack open the bleeder.
This also gets rid of the the old fluid in the caliper.
Top off master when done.
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  #5  
Old 09-18-2001, 12:07 PM
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If you do crack the bleeder to compress the piston into its bore, then be sure to bleed that line when you're done.

I usually use the old/outgoing pad to compress piston(s)...that way you avoid potentially marring the face of the piston.
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Old 09-18-2001, 12:08 PM
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Keep an eye on the brake reservoir. As the pistons are pushed in they are pushing brake fluid into the reservoir. If its already full it can overflow.
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Old 09-18-2001, 08:20 PM
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Michael has it right. How that piston is compressed is the biggest determinate as to whether or not you will cause a rebuild to need be done. Compress the piston evenly and don't mar any of the surfaces.
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Old 09-18-2001, 09:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jim Anderson
Keep an eye on the brake reservoir. As the pistons are pushed in they are pushing brake fluid into the reservoir. If its already full it can overflow.
True. -- That is the advantage of opening the bleeder as you push the caliper back in. The res. level stays the same and you are
not pushing the caliper fluid [ which is usually pretty bad from braking heat] back to the master.
I use a clear plastic hose and container so I can check the fluid condition at the same time. Close bleeder as soon as the cal. is back in.
After changing the pads , open the bleeder again with hose still attached and gravity bleed for a moment and you should be all set. [ again, the clear hose will show solid fluid and color]
By using an offset 9mm box end wrench on the bleeder and then slipping the hose over the nipple, the wrench stays on the bleeder and is opened and closed as needed until that set is done.
Again, keep an eye on the res. fill level.
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